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  • marc1000 - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    "a menu in the bottom-right corner for easily bringing up recently visited sites". the Opera browser has this feature for what? 1 or 2 years now? but in it the button is in the top-right corner.

    well, even Windows 7 copied some things from Opera, i guess they are one of the most innovative companies out there - but the users simply refuse to use their browser. or so it seems... (no, i'm not a fanboy, i have almost all browsers installed on my machine - I use IE/Opera and my Girlfriend uses Crhome, mainly to keep logins separated)
    Reply
  • Spivonious - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    Opera had tabs first too, IIRC.

    Why not use multiple Windows logins? You get a much better separation then.
    Reply
  • marc1000 - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    because sometimes we want to acess both sites at the same time, like having both facebook accounts open and just cycle trough them with ALT+TAB.

    and yes, Opera was first to have tabs, start-page with thumbnails, and a lot of other features. and yet it fails to gain traction and won't see double digit market-share anytime soon, like gevorg said. this is sad for them.
    Reply
  • legaceez - Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - link

    the thing with Opera is even though it's just as good or better technically than most browsers, it renders html and css to WCW standards as opposed to IE. even when it adheres to the standards though it does so differently than FF and Chrome sometimes. so even though it technically renders things correctly some pages won't look right.

    this is an issue because web developers won't handle the case when it doesn't look right in Opera because it's market share is so small. they will do so if it is IE, FF, Safari, or Chrome though.
    Reply
  • marc1000 - Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - link

    yeah, I agree on that... sometimes it just renders the page wrong. but there were an equivalent number of times that only Opera could render a page that caused problems on Chrome or IE.... Reply
  • Zoomer - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    User accounts. Duh. Reply
  • gevorg - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    Who cares about Opera? This article is about Chrome, not some unpopular browser that never got any traction and won't see double digit market-share anytime soon. Reply
  • daniel142005 - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    You should care, because Opera has been a HUGE innovator when it comes to web browsers. I personally don't (and haven't) used it, but that doesn't mean I'm blind as to what it has done for the rest of the browser space. I don't know why Opera hasn't been successful, but it definitely isn't due to the lack of features. Reply
  • marc1000 - Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - link

    do you know a thing that exists only in opera and no one copyed yet? mouse gestures. opera has this feature since version what? 6.0? like, 5 years ago? and no one has been able to copy them.

    i bet that windows 8 will have some sort of mouse gestures, to solve the problem of using a touch-driven UI on a non-touch device like simpler monitors.

    and everybody will say "wooooooooooooow thats aaaaawsome!"
    Reply
  • Omoronovo - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    Chrome has always had the ability to view recently visited sites (and automatically stored groups of sites closed when you exit a window of tabs).

    Chrome 15 simply moves it around a bit with the new tab page; before, it was a link in the bottom left that was often difficult to miss. Now it's an actual button, labelled appropriately for its function.

    You really shouldn't read one line of this mini-review and act on it as if it were the only source of information. Certainly it could have been worded better so you wouldn't assume this was a *new* feature in chrome 15, but it would have taken you all of 10 seconds to Google and realize it's simply been modified in the latest release.

    It really isn't necessary to be a so religious about your browser choice - and your opinions therein - you could have tried to make your point without sounding like an asshat. Unfortunately however, this appears to be the rule, not the exception, when conversing with Opera fanatics.
    Reply
  • marc1000 - Thursday, October 27, 2011 - link

    i'm not a fanatic, i was just pointing that Opera is a great driver of innovations and a lot of companies follow them. but due to some strange market behavior, it simply can't gain market share. i use all of the browsers whenever i need any of them.

    i do not even know what version of chrome is running on my machine, and don't even want to know. but i guess i'm like 10 versions behind the current one, because i downloaded the standalone installer of chrome a year ago and now i realised that they release new versions every month.... and the standalone installer won't auto-update.
    Reply
  • michal1980 - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    Really come on now. This is just stupid. a whole new version 6 weeks after the last one? Reply
  • GuinnessKMF - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    I say it's about time, rapid release cycles means we get more features without bloated massive changes. Would you be happier if they called it 14.1? Does it matter? Reply
  • michal1980 - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    Yes. a Big number change should mean big changes. Now they are just making the number as some sort of 'my number is bigger then yours' game.

    Because bigger = better.
    Reply
  • niva - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    Calm down already, I'm sure you'd find something to complain about if it was numbered 14.1 too. Reply
  • Guspaz - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    Why are you pretending this is new? They've been releasing new versions every month or two for about a year now. How else do you think we got up to version 15 on a browser whose first stable release was only three years ago?

    Google doesn't trumpet the version number to the public like other browser vendors do. Users get automatic frequent small updates, and their announcements of new versions is pretty subdued.

    For those that are interested, Wikipedia has a nice version history:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Chrome#Release...
    Reply
  • daniel142005 - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    And this is relevant how? It's not like you have to worry about going to Google's site and downloading Chrome 15 and updating it yourself. It's all transparent. Now with Firefox it's different, because you get nagged about updates... but that's hopefully changing soon.

    Since when is there a law for how you choose software versions anyway? Unless you're worried it will get higher than you can count... In which case you'd have a valid reason to be concerned.
    Reply
  • heffeque - Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - link

    Are you from the past? - IT crowd Reply
  • tayb - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    Google is starting to annoy me with their ridiculous release cycles and their success is starting to influence other companies to do the same. I would say there has not been anything big enough since version 10 to merit a whole number upgrade yet here we are at Chrome 15 when we should be at Chrome 10.4. It's changing the way people view new releases because Google isn't really releasing anything new.

    I guess I'm just whining for whining sake but I don't like how Google is influencing the industry towards this ridiculous release numbering. Android is just barely on version 4 and Google has logical updates and update versions for that. Why not use the same logic on the browser.
    Reply
  • mwarner1 - Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - link

    I would have thought you would have started whining around version 6-7 when the one to two month release started and would have got over it by now. Reply
  • FaaR - Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - link

    "I guess I'm just whining for whining sake"

    Yes. Also, Chrome is free, so whining that a free program somehow doesn't match up to your (pointless) expectations is a bit too much to stomach IMO.

    Luxury problem much, wouldn't you say?

    What I'd like to see from Chrome is support for left/right swipe on the apple magic mouse, it'd be much more convenient to have browse forwards/back ready at my fingertips; also I could dump the terrible resource and performance hog that is safari if chrome just started supporting this one simple feature... :P
    Reply
  • marc1000 - Thursday, October 27, 2011 - link

    hey, Opera has mouse-swype... left is back, right is forward. it is called "mouse gestures" and if you clik a link and swype down, for example, it will open the link in a new window. click anywhere and swype down then left, it minimizes the current tab. down then right, closes the tab. up maximixe. and a lot more other actions.... Reply
  • jfelano - Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - link

    Did they fix the Flash Player crashing issues that plague Chrome??? Reply
  • mwarner1 - Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - link

    I can't say that I have ever had Chrome crash due to Flash content & I have been using Chrome as my main browser on three PCs since the first publicly released version. Are you sure it is not just something that occurs on your PC? Reply
  • FaaR - Wednesday, October 26, 2011 - link

    Chrome did crash/show sad smileyfaces on tabs rather a lot about two versions ago, it cleared up just fine in version 14. Not had a crash since. Reply
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  • Richard Stallman - Friday, October 28, 2011 - link

    Chrome is the enemy of your freedom and contains malware and botnets Reply

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