Ubuntu 11.10 Released

by Andrew Cunningham on 10/13/2011 10:00 AM EST
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  • Mundtly - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    Good stuff! Can't wait to go home and download. Really impressed with Ubuntu's ease of use as of the last few years. Reply
  • MonkeyPaw - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    Unity totally turned me off in 11.4. It's so dumbed-down it's not funny, and everything is so ridiculously oversized that you could use the OS from across the room. Here's hoping 11.10 is way better. Reply
  • damonlynch - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    You can adjust the icon sizes on the left side to make them smaller. Personally I prefer them smaller. Reply
  • quiksilvr - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    I'm just patiently waiting for Netflix support, then I can migrate over with little trouble. Reply
  • Pokestory1 - Friday, October 14, 2011 - link

    Google chrome's netflix app works, even without silverlight. Reply
  • quiksilvr - Friday, October 14, 2011 - link

    It does for Chrome book, not for Linux. Reply
  • blafrisch - Friday, October 14, 2011 - link

    Chrome OS is a Linux variant. Reply
  • Bateluer - Friday, October 14, 2011 - link

    It still doesn't work under full Linux OSs. Haven't heard of anyone getting it working either. Reply
  • Sivar - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    The desktop LTS releases are indeed supported for three years.
    The server version of 12.04, as with every server LTS release, is supported for five years.
    Reply
  • StormyParis - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    it's actually an indicator of what the problems with IT are. By the time something is debugged, tested, and ready for deployment, it's already obsolete. Reply
  • jalexoid - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    If you pay, they'll support for longer. Reply
  • bupkus - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    Will linux distros follow the trend to portable computing?
    Are there kernels coming for the ARM instruction set?
    Reply
  • Silmarunya - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    They already did. Linux never gave up on alternative architectures, with many distros still supporting long dead architectures like MIPS, as well as adding support for newer ones like ARM.

    Ubuntu is one of the only mainstream distros that only supports x86. The other big boys (Fedora, Debian, ArchLinux and some derivatives of those) all support more architectures than Windows ever did and ever will.

    As for the kernel itself: it was the basis for both WebOS and Android. 'nuff said me thinks.
    Reply
  • bji - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    MIPS is alive and well in many consumer electronics devices, and well supported by Linux. Reply
  • Silmarunya - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    It's indeed rather common as an embedded device and is used occasionally in supercomputers, but that doesn't explain why desktop-oriented distributions continue to support it... Reply
  • bupkus - Friday, October 14, 2011 - link

    Maybe its the volunteers who simply will it into existence. Reply
  • Penti - Sunday, October 16, 2011 - link

    It's not, desktop oriented distributions doesn't support it. Debian is used in many embedded systems be it PowerPC, MIPS or ARM.

    It's a second class unofficial support citizen on desktop oriented systems like Fedora, Ubuntu, Suse (not current or up to date mind you) by third party teams or as secondary projects. Obviously every major community distro does target ARM however, not as a main platform though, but that's not something strange neither are they platforms for none-developers. It's perfectly explainable. Mips is also used in many enterprise equipments like switches and other network equipment and technologies besides being embedded in TVs, NAS-boxes, home-routers, mediastreaming devices, STB's, Blu-ray players and all that. Most of them being based on a GNU/Linux SDK. You even have Android MIPS-ports because it's so popular. There are even MIPS-based Android handsets out there.

    Ubuntu happens to be one of the major platforms organizations like Linaro uses to port Linux to their platforms, doesn't mean Canonical supports it on the standard distro though you won't find it on the download page, but they do release ARM-images for some desktop-like systems. Canonical has been targeting ARM to partner with chip makers for while though. With Ubuntu mobile and so on before.
    Reply
  • fishman - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    You have heard of Android? Reply
  • prophet001 - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    Is Android built on Linux? Reply
  • retrospooty - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    LOL... Yes, so is WebOS. Reply
  • prophet001 - Friday, October 14, 2011 - link

    Why lol?

    I just asked a question.
    Reply
  • K-thiraband-com - Thursday, November 03, 2011 - link

    IDK. In some circles it's considered common knowledge, but not everyone is as tech savvy as the slice of the interweb populace that hangs around here. Maybe it struck him as humorous that an Anandtech commenter wouldn't know that. Reply
  • hechacker1 - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    I'm using openWRT, which is a linux based distro for consumer routers. It supports many different architectures (ARM, MIPS, x86). The list goes on. Reply
  • bupkus - Friday, October 14, 2011 - link

    Now if only I wanted to turn my smartphone into a router. ;) Reply
  • Taft12 - Monday, October 17, 2011 - link

    Tethering? Reply
  • Silmarunya - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    Finally, this release fixes the disaster that Unity was in 11.04. It has very modern and stable repos and all the goodies we came to expect from Ubuntu.

    Sadly, its boot time slowed down yet again, a trend that has been going non stop since version 10.04. Same thing for power consumption (some issue with PCI-e power management seems to be the root issue, but it only affects Ubuntu for some reason).

    If you're new to Linux and don't want any sort of learning curve, nothing beats Ubuntu. If you want something user friendly but don't mind adapting a bit, Fedora is so much better in every way.
    Reply
  • bupkus - Friday, October 14, 2011 - link

    this release fixes the disaster that Unity was in 11.04

    Which is why I'm using Linux Mint.
    Reply
  • Silmarunya - Friday, October 14, 2011 - link

    Do you really like Mint? Benchmarks often show it to be the slowest of the big boys and it has a great deal of Windows envy. Oh, and it's the most commercial distro around with its Mint Search and advertising and donation-begging everywhere.

    Ubuntu is great and Unity became a very valid contender in 11.10 (now that it's finally properly accelerated, comes with a pure 2D version for old hardware and fixed some odd design choices in the initial release).

    I'm starting to like it better than Gnome 3 in some ways. And it certainly beats the bloated pig that Mint's custom skin is - and the even fatter KDE desktop.
    Reply
  • Bateluer - Friday, October 14, 2011 - link

    I've had good luck with Mint, but 11.04 chugged like a snail on my Atom 330 and Ion net-top. You say 11.10 is accelerated, does that include the Ion GPU? Reply
  • Silmarunya - Saturday, October 15, 2011 - link

    If you could boot into Unity in 11.04 without getting a GNOME fallback, the answer should be yes. Reply
  • niva - Monday, October 17, 2011 - link

    People keep saying that but my boot time did not get worse, if anything I feel it got shorter with 11.10 though I didn't time it before I installed the new version.

    Unity is growing on me. I used 11.04 and at first I didn't like it very much but now I'm comfortable with it.
    Reply
  • wifiwolf - Thursday, October 13, 2011 - link

    I'd rather get this spam than about some shoes but it's still spam WTH! Reply

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