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  • DaFox - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    This reads like E-IPS is this new thing and as if this monitor was the first to ship with it. Unfortunately it's over a year or two old at this point and is pretty common in the lower end IPS monitors. Reply
  • Paulman - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I was thinking that this seemed a little late for a U2311H review. Didn't Dell just release a whole new line of IPS displays? It seemed to me like they were planning on phasing out the U2311H generation.

    See U2412M and U2312M:
    http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.a...
    http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.a...

    In fact, here in Canada, the U2412M is back on sale again for $349 CDN (and that's 24" at 1920 x 1200 [16:10])
    Reply
  • Paulman - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Correction: the 23" model's name is U2312HM (and it's 16:9, unlike its 24" brother) Reply
  • Ralos - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Indeed, the U2312H has been available for a few weeks now, and, just like the U2311H before it, is often in special. About once every two months there is a 90-110$ special on it and you can have it at 219$. I bought one for myself, and made 3 friends buy one too (always with the 90-110$ special). I now have the 30" version and love them all.

    Can't ever go back to TN panels now.
    Reply
  • TacticalToast - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    You're right about the specials. Got the U2311H for ~$219 a year ago and haven't looked back. Picked it over the U2410 because of the multitude of complaints over the pink-green tinting on the diagonal. Nary a problem with my monitor. Reply
  • nirolf - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I think you are right, U2311H seems EOL, it's out of stock around here. I hope the U2412M will be reviewed soon. Reply
  • alfredska - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Agreed Reply
  • sean.crees - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I agree, I would much have preferred a review of the new U2412M with IPS and LED backlight in a more traditional 16x10 aspect ratio. Reply
  • baker269 - Wednesday, September 28, 2011 - link

    At this price point 16x9 is the standard. Reply
  • akse - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Just ordered U2412M here in Finland for 289 euros. Waiting it to arrive .) Reply
  • fausto412 - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    i certainly interpreted like it was new tech.

    anyways i want a 25" screen or 24" one to mount on my ergotron monitor arm.
    we need to see more monitor reviews on Anandtech.
    Reply
  • buhusky - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    agreed, need more monitor reviews. Reply
  • wooties - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    +1 Reply
  • Cat - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Please bring back input lag measurement. Reply
  • DaFox - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Agreed. Input lag and pixel response time are the two most important issues to me at this point. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Chris doesn't have a CRT to use as a reference point, so rather than delaying the article we chose to go live without the input lag information. Reply
  • nagi603 - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Does this mean that there won't be an input lag measurement, or that it will be taken later? Reply
  • cheinonen - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I'm trying to get my hands on a CRT this week and then will try to run those tests as quickly as I can. Reply
  • piroroadkill - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Good. I think input lag measurements are important to a lot of people! Reply
  • semo - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Yes. Is it good enough for casual gaming? I'm looking to get a 3 monitor eyefinity setup and wondering if I should have one TN or PVA panel in the middle just for gaming... Reply
  • Flunk - Sunday, October 02, 2011 - link

    I have one of these, bought it for $220 CDN on sale a month or so ago. I haven't had any problems playing FPSes on it but your mileage may vary.

    I've been impressed by the build quality and the picture is better than any other monitor I've ever had, if you're not a graphics professional (then you need a 8bit panel) it's definitely a step above.
    Reply
  • JoeTF - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Uhm.

    Input lag is THE MOST IMPORTANT measurement with e-IPS displays, that are notorious for 30ms+ delays.

    Skipping it is like skipping sequential read tests in hdd review.
    Reply
  • gevorg - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    This is a previous gen monitor, plenty of reviews on the web. Input lag was measured here:
    http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/dell_u2311h.ht...
    Reply
  • enterco - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I own a Dell U2311H, I can't see any noticeable lag. Anyway, the pixperan tool (pixel persistence analyzer) test image looks much better on this display than on my old TN display. Reply
  • ckryan - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Chris,

    Are you the new display intern? I too inquired about the highly coveted display internship, but sadly had been beaten to the punch. Ironically, I too am named Chris, and since I had just purchased a new U2311H from Dell, was planning on doing a "review application" of it.

    It's a good monitor for the price, but mine has some less than desirable characteristics. However, the input lag is quite low as verified by a couple of other reviews (and my eyeballs), and I only find the off-angle darkening slightly annoying. It calibrates pretty well for me and has excellent black levels for an IPS variant -- that, plus I find CCFL to be generally superior. Just because a display is LED backlit doesn't automatically mean it uses less power -- it's often the case, but identical models that vary solely by backlight use similar amounts of power. Finally, I haven't noticed any artifacts from the 6 bit + AFC implementation, which is a bonus. Overall it's pretty good, but now it's kinda close to the U2412 in price now that it's out, and it looks like a better way to go if you're a fan of 16:10 (and who isn't?).

    Anyway, congrats and I'm looking forward to your future reviews.
    Reply
  • Daniel Egger - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    > that, plus I find CCFL to be generally superior.

    CCFL die! Not dead yet? Damn...

    The only problem with LED is that companies can't get their stuff together and do it properly and thus we still see crappy LED backlit displays while the high end still tends to use the more known CCFL backlight.

    But since NEC recently announced a (what will hopefully turn out to be a nice) LED projector I'm getting my hopes up that we will eventually see a high end LED display from NEC as well. Once that happens HP and Dell will follow suit and we'll have an avalanche of professional grade LED backlit displays coming for us...
    Reply
  • Pessimism - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    CCFL needs to die. They may look nicer out of the box but give them a year and they all look weak and yellow. The manufacturers use the cheapest tubes they can find with poor quality phosphors that rapidly loose brightness and color balance. At least LEDs remain consistent for longer, with those you deal with the clear plastic lenses yellowing, again because of poor quality materials. Reply
  • jecs - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Don't hope CCFL to die too soon or we may get a lot of color precision problems. CCFL may seem old tech but it still produces more neutral color across the spectrum than a white only LED lamp. The downside is more power consumption and heavier units but it is not as important for professionals as it may be for consumers.

    On the other hand high end LED screens found today on very expensive TVs or monitors uses 3 LED color matrices for each color (RGB). So don't expect anything true LED for desktop use anytime soon.
    Reply
  • softdrinkviking - Tuesday, October 04, 2011 - link

    jecs +1

    LEDs still have a long way to go.
    they look washed out without being as bright as a CRT. (to me)
    Reply
  • alanwong - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    They're selling the U2312HM here in Australia, assume that means the U2311H is out of date? Reply
  • bennyg - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I got a U2311H for $222 (AUD) bought online, picked up in metro Melbourne a couple of months ago.

    Nice monitor, superb viewing angles. Way ahead of the rest for its price bracket.
    Reply
  • bigpow - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    If you need IPS for work or hobby, you probably won't care for compromises, e.g. this panel.
    If you don't need IPS, ditto above.

    Sadly, it'll probably sell well, since clueless buyers usually go for the mid-priced item of a family.
    Add to that, cheap buyers like to compromise and fool themselves believing they just bought a 'higher-end" product
    Over time, the compromise will become the new high-end. Lowering market expectation and consumer knowledge with it.

    People who couldn't afford nice things should just stick with what they can afford. Compromise only brings standards down for all
    Reply
  • DaFox - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    "People who couldn't afford nice things should just stick with what they can afford."

    Classy.
    Reply
  • jecs - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    It sounded bad for him I agree but I think his general idea, even if it looks negative on the words he picked, still has a merit.

    What we may have with this new Dell monitor IPS line is a superior consumer oriented line or a very low entry for prosumers. Still not competitive in price with TN LED matrices.

    It's a higher low end monitor for a medium class not looking for the cheapest. It just sounds dumb in Simpson's words.
    Reply
  • Slaanesh - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    > Sadly, it'll probably sell well, since clueless buyers usually go for the mid-priced item of > a family.
    > Add to that, cheap buyers like to compromise and fool themselves believing they just
    > bought a 'higher-end" product

    Well I'm looking to buy this monitor.
    I want a gaming monitor but can't stand the horrible quality of a TN panel. So I want the best possible image quality still with acceptable input lag and pixel responsiveness.

    If anyone else knows of a better, more suitable monitor for me, please tell.
    Reply
  • fausto412 - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    "People who couldn't afford nice things should just stick with what they can afford"

    umm...think. about. it.
    They buy the mid range because THAT IS WHAT THEY CAN AFFORD!
    Reply
  • tzhu07 - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    At the design agency I work at, our Art Director has to use one of these as a secondary monitor (next to an iMac screen), and it is plain awful. My boss, who didn't do much research, kinda bought it on a whim. Now even he says it's crap. Reply
  • jecs - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    um, are you using any calibration tool? Reply
  • orenlevy - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Currently in israel the U2311H is last stocks... 235 US$
    and the U2312HM is stock for 2 weeks 245 US$
    Better lag Better response time
    Better contrast.
    Reply
  • Slaanesh - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Are there any reviews yet for this year's U2312HM model?
    How does it compare to last year's U2311H?
    Reply
  • jabber - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    ...with just buying a PVA panel instead? Reply
  • Aphelion02 - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Nice article, but so late as to be dangerously close to being irrelevant. A large amount of people who might have found this useful have already made their purchasing decisions almost a year ago. I have noticed this as quite a trend at AT, with this article and the P8P68 mobo review as being most striking. At some point, the added value of a late review is so minimal you are better off spending the effort on something else. Reply
  • dingetje - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    more 1920x1080 reviews?
    I like Dell, but here's what I think: they can shove all their 16:9 panels up their @$$
    Reply
  • A5 - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Cool story bro.

    The market has spoken, and they want cheap 16:9 1080p monitors. Dell isn't going to make a 16:10 monitor that won't sell to satisfy you.
    Reply
  • Makaveli - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Its funny you say that cause Dell already has a 16:10 24' model that is superior to this.

    The market is also full of dumb ass best buy shoppers!
    Reply
  • Dug - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    The market hasn't spoken,
    No one I have ever spoken too prefers 16:9 to 16:10
    And that sentiment is echoed in every forum I come across.
    16:9 is what has been shoved down our throats
    Reply
  • user1003 - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    This monitor is horrible. The whole stand is nice and adjustable, but the panel itself is plagued with a lot of problems, among them:

    - tinting (google it, it's a problem with the whole series, and the 24" series too). there are yellow stripes at the screen borders and the whole left side is slightly tinted yellow, too. the area effected by the tinting differs, but a lot of the U23 and U24 Dells have this problem
    - the anti glare coating distorts small details like fonts
    - the PSU makes a loud humming noise when set to <95% brightness, so you either become blind or deaf
    - clouding at the edges

    Some of them are better than others so you could get lucky (and let's face it, they sent Anandtech a good one for testing), but overall this monitor just sucks, even considering the low price.
    Reply
  • jecs - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    That is too bad. But also makes me feel safe with the higher quality 2470 ultrasharp. This screen is working very well, I have a lot of input connectors to choose from, 1920 x 1200 screen and I have 0 problems after a year of use. But, also remember this new matrices may still be 6 bits for color depth and that LED panels are good on power consumption but not very good for precision color. However I don't know why Dell is having such a product on the market if it not ready. It also makes me wonder if Dell is lowering the quality to appeal to new audiences but instead is disappointing loyal customers. Reply
  • tech6 - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    To all those who complain that this panel is far from perfect for design work: I would have to agree but that's not the market it aims for. For starters, any 1080 panel is no good for layout work so if that's what you're looking for there are a number of $500+ monitors that will meet your needs. This panel is designed as an upgrade to mediocre $200 TN monitors and it does a great job and it does a great job. We bought a number of these for the office last year and they put all other TN panels to shame. For those considering a 1080 work or home display, this is a high quality bargain. Reply
  • Miggleness - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I've had this monitor for over a year now, hope you can do a followup and put the U2312 to the test as well. You'd definitely be able to get a good assessment on it's improvements over the U2311 (if any) while this review is fresh. Reply
  • pjfan75 - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Can you post the calibration settings you used?

    Thanks!
    Reply
  • cheinonen - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I will grab the settings I used when I hook it up for the input lag test, but since the majority of the work is done with the LUTs in your graphics chip, and not in the display itself, it really won't get you that much of an improvement over the stock settings unfortunately. Reply
  • Zoomer - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    How about a review of HP's line, the ZR24w, etc, or maybe even a comparison? Reply
  • Makaveli - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I own a ZR24w and I would love to see this. From what I have researched the HP screen uses a real 8 bit panel and would love to see this compared to the 6bit+AFC in this. I'm sure if the Dell 24 inch version is also a non 8 bit panel? Reply
  • TegiriNenashi - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    EOM Reply
  • the_engineer - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I Love these monitor reviews. Thanks for working hard on this! I would REALLY love to see a comparison of the current monitor technologies (H-IPS; E-IPS; Samsung's newest tech; TN Panels; Discussion of diffrent styles of LED backlights etc....) and which monitor lines we can find each tech in. This is a very complex issue and actually very pressing for those of us amateur turning-pro photographers and graphic designers on a budget. I've even seen some 40"+ LED backlit Televisions that claim to use IPS technology that i've considered for a display mostly for the price per inch ratio seems so good. Any thoughts on why that might be a bad idea if they are IPS panels? Reply
  • fausto412 - Wednesday, September 28, 2011 - link

    yes, i would like to see comparison of technologies... Reply
  • TwinIon - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I own three of these. Great monitors for the price, but wait for a Dell sale. I got mine for closer to $250 each.

    Displayport was a real benefit for me since I wanted to use the screens for eyefinity, which requires DP for at least one monitor. The ability to adjust the screens has also proved very important for eyefinity.
    Reply
  • xi1inx - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    I remember in the last 12 mouth, another Dell IPS screen was reviewed here. I recall this monitor have also the same price and have a Genesys board inside to drive the lcd. It's perhaps the same monitor with the dvi port instead, So, I saw many reader comments say this ips lcd is bad. I prefer at this point to pursage a nice and bright used Apple Cinema Display HD 23" for the same price. I very happy with this screen and I'm not regrating to don't have buy the Dell one.

    I think the Apple Cinema Display HD 23" could be a good comparison monitor to compare with new incomers, if you could found one like new. It perhaps an old monitor but it certainly clash with the Dell offers.
    Reply
  • Despoiler - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    Check out the NEC EA231WMi. It has since been discontinued for a newer model with a LED backlight, but I got it just south of $300. It suffers none of the issues Dell's E-IPS panels do. It can be calibrated to be quite accurate. In fact you can download a calibration file from TFT Central from their review. You can get .inf files for 75hz and 83hz over display port. There is no input lag or ghosting that I can detect and I play a lot of video games. The stand on it is epicly good. Simply put there are a lot better and cheaper E-IPS panels than what Dell offers. NEC is worth the look. Reply
  • coburn_c - Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - link

    a 6-bit IPS with FRC?

    someones missing the point
    Reply
  • fausto412 - Wednesday, September 28, 2011 - link

    Anandtech has turned into a totally different site and when they do post a monitor review...it is something that isn't worst my money.

    We need more frequent reviews and especially of the high end. I want to see 120hz monitors reviewed. There are many available. I want to know which is the best image quality and which is best bang for my buck.
    Reply
  • simi13 - Thursday, September 29, 2011 - link

    I have the exact same display bought 1 year ago and I've been extremely pleased by it. Reply
  • manuel.andrei - Thursday, October 06, 2011 - link

    How about a review on the new Samsung S24A850DW? Reply
  • Kyanzes - Monday, October 10, 2011 - link

    I have tried four different units, all of them had a disurbing yellow tinting on the left and similarly extensive blue tinting on the right. Later, the fourth also developed a dead pixel. That was the point when I finally moved on. My worst nightmare. Reply

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