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  • A5 - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Looks dumb as hell. Reply
  • VivekGowri - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Dude led development of Pentium M and Centrino, and is now a VP at Intel. Dude can do whatever the hell he wants.

    For my part, I actually like Mooly's beret...
    Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    The only people who should be allowed to wear berets are the French, special forces, and Jamie Hyneman. Reply
  • akse - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Thats a backwards beret.. used to see these around in the 90's :) Reply
  • Deepcover96 - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    It's a Kangol, Like Doug E Fresh wears. Reply
  • rodrigu3 - Thursday, July 28, 2011 - link

    Samuel L Jackson wears it, which makes Mooly Eden cool by association. Reply
  • R117 - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Tomoe Mami is also allowed to wear a beret!

    But seriously though, it still always amazes me how we have to lose so many chips around the edges of these circular wafers thanks to the single crystal boule manufacturing process. Then again, I was told that the chips near the centre of the wafer are typically the best, with the ones near the edges being worse (in terms of quality as it relates to OC'ing capability, power etc).
    Reply
  • hyvonen - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Maybe he used to be in Mossad..? Reply
  • mars2k - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Is that pronounced doo-dy?. Yeah hat's out of style , Mooly is to old for a hat and Moolyneeds to get over it..there is nothing wrong with bald. Besides if you hate your hailiner that much get a transplant you can afford it. A wig perhaps? Anything other than that hat Reply
  • daidaloss - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    I don't think so. He looks like a geek. Like an engineer.

    He's not your typical "white-sparkling-teeth-all-smiles" HR/PR guy.
    I actually like his beret. Kangool. Loved them back in the 90'
    Reply
  • softdrinkviking - Wednesday, June 01, 2011 - link

    poor moody! it's just a hat people!

    i think it's nice. kinda makes him look like a bad-guy in a cyber-punk novel.
    Reply
  • TonyB - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    he just needs to grow a mustache and he'll be Jamie Hyneman's twin brother. Reply
  • Jamahl - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    162mm^2 vs 216mm^2, guess what intels priorities are. Not graphics anyway. Reply
  • dananski - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    If you made a SNB with the same number of transistors but at 22nm instead of 32nm, it would be 102mm^2. Ivy bridge seems to have over 50% more area than that, which may well be extra graphics cores among other things :) Reply
  • OneArmedScissorB - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Somebody should have used a calculator. :p

    This is pretty much a straight shrink, with just barely a little extra for the paltry 4 more EUs. There doesn't even appear to be more cache, which raises even more questions about Intel's outlandish claims of a 20% increase in "performance."
    Reply
  • DanNeely - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    having a calculator is pointless if you don't put the right stuff into it.. Feature size is related to area, or feature size squared. (22/32)^2 =47%. 216*.47 = 102mm. Jamahl's math is correct. They've got 50% more transistors being used for (mostly undefined) stuff. The extra 4 EUs are part, but unless they got significantly larger most of the extra area is going to something else. Reply
  • maroon1 - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    "This is pretty much a straight shrink, with just barely a little extra for the paltry 4 more EUs"

    HD2000 which has 6 EU and it is faster than Clarkdale GPU which has 12 EU, and much faster than GMA 4500 which has 10 EU
    Reply
  • krumme - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Now the size is about okey, but should be fun competing with 40mm2 28nm bobcats wether or not AMD and Intel likes it.
    So next step must be good performance where it matters for the consumer segment. 16 eu and so what?
    My SB still have gpu drivers that gives bad performance. All that excellent production technology wasted for nothing.
    Reply
  • Doltmoopsie - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    They are going to be selling a 25% smaller die in Ivy Bridge, when compared to Sandy Bridge. Intel should jump to 32 EU's for laptops and full-price desktop parts.

    Perhaps they can't feed 32 EU's with memory bandwidth, but they should at least give us 24 EU's as was once rumored. When you are at 50% of the performance of a $65 card, you need to CATCH UP not just tread water.
    Reply
  • ChuckDriver - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    My guess is that primarily Intel wants more dies per wafer, which should result in greater margin on these products. A secondary reason for Intel "treading water" with the number of execution units, a very apt metaphor, could be the Federal Trade Commission's legal action against Intel. Maybe Intel fears further action if it continues eroding the bottom end of the GPU market with a higher performance solution and it does not want to appear to the FTC as being anticompetitive. Reply
  • DanNeely - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Don't we see smaller dies every time Intel does a tick, and larger ones on the tock?

    Both yields and total wafers produced are lower at the start of a tick, so Intel needs to keep die sizes down to get the volume they need. In addition it gives them the die area growth room they need for the new features that will be coming out with the next tock.

    Beyond that, just looking at the size of dies at a single core count is partially missing the point if some price points get more cores with the new generation than the old.
    Reply
  • maroon1 - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Remember than HD2000 which has 6 EU beats Clarkdale GPU. And we know that Clarkdale GPU has 12 EU like HD3000

    The older GMA 4500 has 10 EU

    So, in other words EU doesn't mean anything when you compare older GPU architecture to a newer one.
    Reply
  • aegisofrime - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Showing off Ivy Bridge just when I am considering getting a i7-2600K (because Bulldozer is most likely delayed), well that's just evil! Reply
  • marc1000 - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    well, I was waiting for Z68 to buy a SB system. the Z68 launched only a couple weeks ago. Now I decided that I may perfectly wait until Ivy Bridge, because if my Penryn lasted this long, it can survive just a few more quarters... Reply
  • Mr Perfect - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Don't wait to long. :) I've been doing the same thing with my Toledo(points if you remember what that was), and it's really hit rock bottom now. Reply
  • Touche - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    I don't think you spammed the front page enough. Please, put a few dozen more articles from Computex, every item/topic/hint/rumour separately, of course. Reply
  • FaaR - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    What are you complaining about, want your money back or something? Oh, that's right, you never paid any. Anandtech is free.

    So why don't you pipe down for a bit ok, because if you're unhappy with the service given or the contents (both free, as already mentioned), you're welcome to start your own hardware news and review website plus forum, buy plane tickets and hotel room to Taiwan to attend Computex and so on.

    Good luck with that.
    Reply
  • daidaloss - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Are you unemployed or what? Reply
  • monomer - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Tip: On the front page, click on "Just Reviews" then you won't have to be subjected to all this heinous tech news that is plaguing the site. Reply
  • PlasmaBomb - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    About 1.5 billion transistors then? Reply
  • iwod - Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - link

    Let say we have 50% of Added Cache, and Double the transistor count for Gfx.

    That should be about the size of Ivy.
    Reply

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