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  • pugster - Monday, March 24, 2008 - link

    Intel core2duo is probably good for business, but the OS doesn't need need anything more than 2 cores running at an average of 2ghz. I know that there are people out there who wants the latest and greatest for games, but more and more people rather buy in a game console like the ps2 rather than putting money down for an geforce 9800. It seems that the only way for Intel to make money making new products like the silverthorne or going back on the flash memory race. Reply
  • PlasmaBomb - Thursday, March 20, 2008 - link

    Since it is based on penryn isn't 16 MB of cache an odd number? Should that not be 18 MB? (i.e. 3 x dual cores at 6 MB each) Reply
  • IntelUser2000 - Sunday, March 23, 2008 - link

    Plasmabomb, Penryn has 6MB L2, not L3. Dunnington has 16MB L3 in addition to the whatever L2 it will have, please read! Reply
  • perzy - Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - link

    Larrabee, thats good news. Finally some competition in the graphics department!
    Let's face it, right now you can get 2 xbox 360's and an ipod for the price of one fast graphics card...that can't be right.

    Reply
  • AcaClone - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    What can I say ... Reply
  • AcaClone - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    On second thought - I guess that it is possible that the demo software is indeed multithreaded, but that only one thread is running when left idle?? Reply
  • ajg - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    The slide showing Intel: The architeturr for life is a page lifted from AMDs slide "Diversifying Platform Design Tracks"

    link below
    http://www.tgdaily.com/index.php?option=com_conten...">http://www.tgdaily.com/index.php?option...mp;slide...

    The CPU architecture is no different. I guess can't make expect an old dog to come up with new tricks?
    Reply
  • clnee55 - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Yes, AMD said it but couldn't do it. Easily said than done Reply
  • micha90210 - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Is that possible? There's a limit in XP to 3.25GB of ram. XP can't handle 16GB... is that picture real? Reply
  • oldhoss - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    I'd venture to guess either XP Pro x64, or Windows 2003 Server. Reply
  • haplo602 - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    I wonder what the real world usage will be. I mean first you need to get Microsoft to code a new version of Windows to eat all that horse power. Then you are back at the begining... You have more cores but Windows is using most of them again (or not using all of them in case of old version).

    Anyway I don't see any significant benefits of these CPUs except highend server and workstation load.

    Consumer will drift more into the console or memory/specialised processing unit (GPU, sound processors ...) markets ...
    Reply
  • oldhoss - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    The screwdriver is actually fuel for the IFRPS (Intel Fusion Reactor power supply), rated @ 1.21 Jigawatts! ;-P Reply
  • brshoemak - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    I assume I'm not the only one who notices the glass of OJ on the 4 core Nehalem system? Kinda odd as I doubt they carry a lot of spares around. Reply
  • ryback - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    It's not OJ. It's a screwdriver. Reply
  • tmouse - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Its part of the new processor cooling system. Also Intel's additional strategy Tick, Tock, Crock : enough alcohol = even BETTER coverage by the press ;) Reply
  • 7Enigma - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    HAHAHAHA! Very nice. Reply
  • Imaginer - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    With intel doing things that way, I would expect the PC platform to finally have a standard instruction set for graphics processing similar to general purpose computing with the x86 standard. Would that mean that it would be ALOT EAISER for game developers to produce for the PC akin the way they are doing right now specializing for a particular console?

    I like that idea very much. Hopefully AMD/ATi and Nvidia would eventually be in on the standard as well.
    Reply
  • Griswold - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    I too think you got it all wrong on that one. See the other comment. Reply
  • kaddar - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    No, because in general game development isn't done on instruction sets or assembly, it's done in programming languages utilizing API's. Specifically, DirectX or OpenGL. The architecture is abstracted away, and rightly so. Reply
  • Nihility - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    Sounds pretty exciting. The huge cache on the Penryn procs does a pretty good job of negating the side effects of the slower memory interconnect so I'd be surprised if we see huge gains from Nehalem just because of the memory part as it wasn't that big of a bottleneck. Probably see more benefits on the server side. However, 8 cores is definitely a treat. Reply
  • dreddly - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    Am I the only one who finds this headline offensive to women? Japan's gender relations are bad enough without another western male-dominated site using the sexualized asian women as a standard trope to talk about 'exposing' new information. Reply
  • AcaClone - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Wow, I am really impressed how easy some people get offended - but then I am Danish ;-)

    However, your state of mind is entirely ungrounded and based on a lacking understanding of Japan - some people might get offended by such lacking knowledge about cultures. Kimonos are worn by BOTH sexes - I know for sure, as I have worn one often both when visiting and working in Japan.

    Kjeld Olesen
    Reply
  • dreddly - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    So would 'Up the skirt' be an equally appropriate headline?

    Skirts and kilts are also worn by men, so if the image was replaced by a man in a skirt and 'Up the skirt' was the headline would it still be appropriate?

    The point is that the headline and the image have nothing whatsoever to do with the accompanying article.

    It is inappropriate on a technology site to equate the release of a new processor with the exposure of a asian women's body (would the reference be as titillating if it was an white north american woman?). If this was maxim, this would be a different story, but there is a long history of western society stereotyping asian women as submissive sexualized objects, that this headline yet again reproduces.
    Reply
  • masher2 - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    > "would the reference be as titillating if it was an white north american woman?"

    Would you be as offended if it were? As for your nonsense about the headline "stereotyping asian women as submissive sex objects", sounds like you have too much time on your hands to me.

    The world has *real* problems. This isn't one of them. Men like women...so what? Go to any beach in the world and you'll see women intentionally exposing far more than this picture...or was suggested by the headline.

    Reply
  • dreddly - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    > Would you be as offended if it were? As for your nonsense about the headline "stereotyping asian women as submissive sex objects", sounds like you have too much time on your hands to me.

    My point was that the absurdity and offense would be doubly obvious. The rest of your point was a non-sequitur.

    >The world has *real* problems. This isn't one of them. Men like women...so what? Go to any beach in the world and you'll see women intentionally exposing far more than this picture...or was suggested by the headline.

    Then why wasn't the picture one of women on a beach - or any instance where a woman was obviously choosing to disrobe? The point is that this type of thinking breeds environments that are hostile and objectifying to women. I hope that your organization doesn't run into any litigious women down the road, because this type of thinking breeds situations ripe for lawsuits. If that isn't a 'real problem' for you, you must be better off than most...
    Reply
  • masher2 - Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - link

    > "The point is that this type of thinking breeds environments that are hostile and objectifying to women"

    Ah, so now a picture of a woman in a kimono is now responsible for causing rape and abuse of women? Thank god you're not a member of the movie censorship board, or we'd all be watching nothing but reruns of "Lassie" and 'The Ghost and Mr. Chicken".

    > "Then why wasn't the picture one of women on a beach - or any instance where a woman was obviously choosing to disrobe?"

    You believe the woman in that picture was kidnapped and forced to wear that kimono? I see, I see...interesting theory!
    Reply
  • dreddly - Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - link

    Perhaps more disturbing is the fact that you think 'hostility and objectification' EQUALS rape and abuse. I made no such implication, and you seem to be exposing a hostility towards women of your own in such a statement.

    The image is irrelevant and immaterial to the article. It should be removed at that basis.

    The woman on the beach would be choosing an objectification of her body. The image of the woman in the Kimono was making no such implication, and it was the accompanying headline that insinuated that idea.

    If there were no other undertones, then we should all agree that a man wearing a kilt (lets say Gibson from Braveheart) could be pictured with the headline 'Up the skirt' and it would be interpreted the same way.
    Reply
  • masher2 - Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - link

    > The woman on the beach would be choosing an objectification of her body. The image of the woman in the Kimono was making no such implication"

    The woman in the photo chose to have her picture taken. Or are you again reverting to the wild idea she was somehow forced against her will to model?

    > "The image is irrelevant and immaterial to the article"

    It's a metaphor, equating Intel's openness to the intimacy generated during a sexual encounter. Get it? A valid literary technique, sadly misinterpreted by a few priggish bible-thumper wannabees.

    > "you seem to be exposing a hostility towards women of your own in such a statement. "

    You're seriously reaching with such nonsense.
    Reply
  • jasongg06 - Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - link

    "The woman in the photo chose to have her picture taken. Or are you again reverting to the wild idea she was somehow forced against her will to model? "

    The woman may have had her photo taken, but do you honestly thing it was for this article?

    "It's a metaphor, equating Intel's openness to the intimacy generated during a sexual encounter. Get it? A valid literary technique, sadly misinterpreted by a few priggish bible-thumper wannabees. "

    The metaphor/analogy or w/e you want to call it, was made with bad judgment and is inappropriate. Why you're still defending it, I don't know, but you should seek some help. The fact that you think stuff like this is acceptable tells us something about your character, or your lack of.
    Reply
  • masher2 - Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - link

    But no one here has successfully advanced any argument as to *why* you believe this is objectionable. Except for a few vague mutterings about "objectification" which are wholly unconvincing,

    Yes, the headline subtly interjected sex into the article context. Was it "tasteless"? I won't offer an opinion, but it certainly was not "insulting to women" -- or even worse, "all Asians". In fact, I find a comment singling out a certain race to be racist in itself.

    As for my personal views on the subject, they correspond perfectly with those of feminist Camile Paglia, a woman whose been called 'the Smartest Woman in America'. Most men enjoy sex. A slightly smaller percentage of women do as well. Using a sexual metaphor to sell a story isn't in itself "objectifying" women. I saw nothing in the headline which "perpetuated any stereotypes" of submission, dominance, or sexual exploitation.

    > "The woman may have had her photo taken, but do you honestly thing it was for this article? "

    Why do you think it would even matter?
    Reply
  • dreddly - Wednesday, March 19, 2008 - link

    Your stubborn refusal to acknowledge the repeated objections to the insertion of a sexually inappropriate innuendo into the headline does not constitute 'vague mutterings'.

    If this site persistently juxtaposed sexually charged images of women with their headlines (akin to maxim) to make a literary statements or metaphors, then it would not be an issue. The objection is to complete irrelevance and seeming ignorant refusal to justify why the image of a Japanese women was chosen and why a traditionally conservative and respectful piece of clothing -the kimono- became the focal point for 'exposure'.

    The point you have consistently ignored is that if we replace the image of the Japanese women with a man or a image of a woman on the beach, the non-nonsensical nature of the headline is overly and absurdly apparent.

    Your persistent attempts to imply that this argument is anti-sex is as laughable as your understanding of contemporary feminism. If anandtech has decided to go the maxim route, fine, there is an range of arguments and a justifiable reasons to counterpose technology and sex. The problem is that there is no justification or purpose for the headline - it isn't very literary and doesn't relate to the overall purpose of the site. As such, it is a superficial and unnecessary trope, the use of which DOES replicate and connotate a persistent stereotype of sexualized asian women. The use of the stereotype out of ironic or literary context appears to be DESIGNED to offend women and asians who object to those oversimplications that have often used to discriminate and marginalize in the past.
    Reply
  • Screammit - Sunday, March 23, 2008 - link

    "The use of the stereotype out of ironic or literary context appears to be DESIGNED to offend women and asians..."

    I'm totally with you on this Anandtech marginalization conspiracy theory, but i'm pretty sure the girl in the picture did something to deserve it. I was kinda hoping for the new Nehalem chips to be used as pasties, but hey, there's always the next article, right?
    Reply
  • hobel - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    You are the only who thinks that a kimono is womans clothing only.
    In the context with the image, ok... but the headline only is gender neutral. Or never seen a sumo ringer in kimono?
    Reply
  • jasongg06 - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Well put. This title is inappropriate. Not only is it offensive to women, it is also offensive to Asians in general. You'd think in 2008 people would have better taste and judgment. Reply
  • masher2 - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    > "it is also offensive to Asians in general..."

    The headline implies:

    a) That somewhere in the world, some women still wear kimonos, at least under some circumstances.
    b) That at least some men still remain sexually attracted to women.

    Which of these suggestions is "offensive to Asians in general"?
    Reply
  • ocyl - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Agreed. I don't think that the article title and the front-page image are appropriate, either, considering that there is no need to sensitize / emotionalize the subject matter. Reply
  • madoka - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Yes, the title and imagery is pretty crass and tasteless. Reply
  • masher2 - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    I commend you on your ability to be offended by pointless trivia. Reply
  • Griswold - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Good thing you're not the authority on what is "pointless trivia" and what is not. Reply
  • Tilmitt - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    As someone with a Japanese girlfriend...I loved the title! Reply
  • Yongsta - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Anime Characters don't count. Reply
  • RamIt - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    Yep, you are the only one that cares :) Reply
  • teko - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    I also ponder on the title and image. Actually, I clicked and read the whole article trying to look for a connection.

    Yea, I think it's bad taste.
    Reply
  • Owls - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Who cares. If only Elliot Spitzer paid his hookers in Penryns no one would have known. Reply
  • Deville - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    Wow! Exciting stuff!

    AMD? Hello???
    Reply
  • InternetGeek - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    But would you rather buy a Tick processor or a Tock processor?

    In any case you have to accept that the following generation (Tick or Tock) will perform faster. It's how Intel makes money.

    The scenario is that on keeping your computer for 3-4 years. I rekcon that's still the average time. Basically when your GPU can no longer play the new games decently. On the CPU side, I think buying a Tock processor might be a better deal because you're getting the refined version of your generation.

    Problem is the way Intel introduces their SIMD extensions. I've seen that done randomly (Ticks or Tocks) and sometimes you do want to have those extensions.

    Is there a way to correlate Ticks/Tocks and SIMD extensions?
    Reply
  • ocyl - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    For some unknown reasons, Intel's "tick-tock" terminology is used inversely of the same phrase's common understanding, per Page 4 of the article. With Intel, "tock" refers to a brand new generation, while "tick" refers to refinement of the current generation. Why this is the case, I have no idea.
    Reply
  • InternetGeek - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    I think you got it wrong. It is perfectly explained at http://www.intel.com/technology/tick-tock/index.ht...">http://www.intel.com/technology/tick-tock/index.ht...

    Tick is a new silicon process, Tock is an upgrade.

    ---
    Year 1: "Tick"
    Intel delivers a new silicon process technology that dramatically increases transistor density versus the previous generation. This technology is used to enhance performance and energy efficiency by shrinking and refining the existing microarchitecture.

    Year 2: "Tock"
    Intel delivers an entirely new processor microarchitecture to optimize the value of the increased number of transistor and technology updates that are now available
    ---
    Reply
  • InternetGeek - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    Ehm, You're actually correct. Tick is the upgrade. Tock is the new thing. Reply
  • masher2 - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    Not quite. "Tick" is the new silicon process (the shrink). "Tock" is the new uCore architecture. They're both "new things".

    From a refinement perspective, the Tick generation will also typically include uCore refinements, and the Tock likewise includes process refinements.
    Reply
  • ocyl - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    It appears that Intel views this not necessarily from a perspective of technology / end product, but one of foundry. There is nothing wrong with it, however; it's just a bit odd at first and takes some time in getting used to. Reply
  • Che - Monday, March 17, 2008 - link

    Wow, 16 threads! Got to hand it to Intel, they are on top of their game for sure. Reply
  • Griswold - Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - link

    Now all we need is a (desktop) windows that can actually do something good with 8 logical (or more) cores. Reply

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