POST A COMMENT

36 Comments

Back to Article

  • rhangman - Friday, December 14, 2007 - link

    If you are going to compare, then surely a Via Nanobook based solution would be the way to go.

    http://www.via.com.tw/en/initiatives/spearhead/nan...">http://www.via.com.tw/en/initiatives/spearhead/nan...

    Same sized screen/resolution.
    Faster clocked chip.
    Longer battery life.
    Larger storage.
    Lighter.
    Very similar dimentions.
    You also get MPEG-2, MPEG-4, WMV9 HD acceleration, although only with via's poorly implimented drivers and applications under Linux. Openchrome should at least add MPEG-2 support eventually though.

    The Asus is I think better looking and cheaper though.
    http://www.viagallery.com/index.php?option=com_fli...">http://www.viagallery.com/index.php?opt...s&Se...
    Reply
  • Schugy - Monday, December 03, 2007 - link

    I would by any other cheap subnotebook with an Athlon 64 2000+ (8W TDP), Radeon Xpress 1250 and a more open Ubuntu Mobile on it. Reply
  • PCTC2 - Monday, December 03, 2007 - link

    1) You can modify the GUI to include a start button to access a lot more features on the EeePC by changing the file value of TaskBarShowStartMenu from 0 to 1 in the directory /etc/X11/icewm

    2) A 10" version with 16GB of SSD space is rumored to be in development for mid-late next year.

    I say chuck Xandros and put Ubuntu on it.
    Reply
  • PCTC2 - Monday, December 03, 2007 - link

    Just kidding about the 10" version. Just a rumor that has now been proven to be false. My b. Reply
  • krwilsonn - Sunday, December 02, 2007 - link

    What is the effect of web browsing on the device since I would imaging most webpages are designed for 800 x 600 or above? Also is the voting system removed from this comments section? Reply
  • JarredWalton - Monday, December 03, 2007 - link

    Browsing is "okay" - much better than a PDA, but as you guessed there are sites designed for 1024x768 (and even 1280x1024). The vertical size isn't as much of a problem, and really you can deal with the 800 width. AnandTech, for example, you miss some of the right and left columns but can keep the main article content in view. Most sites are like that. But then, I'm spoiled by running at 30" LCD at 2560x1600. :)

    I don't know what happened to comment ratings - I guess we ditched that with the upgrade. Or maybe it's just not present for now. There are a few areas of the updated site that still appear to have some bugs to work out.
    Reply
  • shadghost - Sunday, December 02, 2007 - link

    I have been using one for a few days now, and on the first day i got out of "easy mode" and i must tell you it is easy to install new programs with out even going to a new OS, true, apt-get install does not have a lot of programs, but most sites are now putting out .deb, and i find these easier to install then a windows program. I think i am going to switch over to ubuntu, only partly because i feel the OS is crippled, but mainly i have a server hosting ubuntu on my local network. I must say, it is a good little computer, way better then my last laptop that was about 15 pounds to just go to class, now it is down to two pounds plus my backpack.

    me love the Eee
    On the down side, i am downgrading from a 22 inch wide screen and a 17 inch 4:3 to the 7 inch... that is the hardest part.... and that it did not come with ssh server and client pre-installed
    Reply
  • n0nsense - Sunday, December 02, 2007 - link

    you can always add more repositories for additional software.
    Synaptic package manager will make it easy for newbies.
    Reply
  • Ihlosi - Saturday, December 01, 2007 - link

    ... to me, it does have some minor issues that add up.

    1. Why 800x480 ? That's such a weird resolution. 800x600 would be almost infinitely preferable.
    2. Leave out the crappy webcam and microphone.
    3. Why no PCMCIA/CardBus ?
    4. eSATA would be nice, but is probably asking too much.
    Reply
  • mmntech - Saturday, December 01, 2007 - link

    800x480 would qualify as WVGA. It's a 5:3 aspect ratio. It is a non standard aspect ratio though. Regular WVGA is 854x480.

    I have a lot of issues with the Eee PC. Namely price and lack of storage. It would be interesting to crack it open and tinker with it to see what it can do. I assume the hard drive is a standard 2.5'' laptop form factor. I'd be curious to see what would happen if someone tossed a mechanical drive in there. Flash drives offer higher seek time and lower power consumption but mechanical drives last longer and are still cheaper dollar per gigabyte.
    It's a cute toy but the hardware is really far too antiquated, especially if you install XP on it and realize you can't run half of your programs. Dell had some 15'' Sempron 3600 laptops for $499 so if you want something cheap, that's the better buy. 12'' laptops aren't much of a burden and if you buy one that's a couple years old, they're the close in price to the Eee PC.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Sunday, December 02, 2007 - link

    As others have pointed out, this isn't competing in the same market as 15" notebooks, or even 12" models. That's both good and bad - I'd personally take a 12" laptop, but then those start at about 3x the cost of the Eee PC 4G. :|

    Also, you're correct that 800x480 is not a standard AR. It really doesn't matter too much outside of running certain applications, but 16:10 would really be a 768x480 resolution. You're talking about 16:9, when you say 854x480, which is in some ways just as non-standard. I'd still like something higher, though... 1024x640 would be a lot better. It's amazing what 160 extra pixels in height can do. But then it would be more difficult for vision-impaired people to read the screen.
    Reply
  • shadghost - Sunday, December 02, 2007 - link

    it is a solid state storage device onto the mb, not any standard form factor, non removable Reply
  • tmx220 - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    I thought the name for these are subnotebooks
    or is that not standard yet?
    Reply
  • nubie - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    I don't know where Anand got such WRONG data, this clearly shows upgradeable memory: http://forum.eeeuser.com/viewtopic.php?id=3626">http://forum.eeeuser.com/viewtopic.php?id=3626

    The 700 is the version that has been showing up without a so-dimm, that is the "$200" version, AFAIK even the 2GB Surf model with 256MB ram is going to be $300 and have the upgradeable RAM.

    As far as the "Voided warranty" bit, the only way the designers/engineers were able to get this put on the market is by convincing those in charge that it isn't a computer, the entire company seems to believe it too.

    As far as how small it is and how much money and performance, it is much much smaller than a Vostro (like less than half the size), so it isn't really the same thing, do some price-searching on a laptop this size and you will soon see that the price is less than half as expensive as similarly sized models with equal horsepower.

    I think we will continue to see ignorant comments comparing it to laptops for a long time (if not forever), simply because these people have never used something as small as a Toshiba Libretto, let me tell you it is a big step up from a Libretto 110CT (233mmx 32/64MB RAM)

    I am just really hoping that we get some competition and have more of these for around $300.

    WINDOWS CE!!! Screw that, if you don't understand the difference, STFU!!!.

    I have struggled to get a CE device to update its OS, you can't do it, you need the MFR to give you the bootloader and the OS restore, and if it gets FUBAR'd, there is nothing you can do. XP/Linux is infinitely better.

    Not to mention the ability to use apps/games/utilities, UGH, CE should curl up and die.
    Reply
  • psychobriggsy - Saturday, December 01, 2007 - link

    It's clear that the costs on this thing can come down a lot once Intel creates an x86 SoC that incorporates the CPU (like this 900MHz Dothan), the northbridge, a GPU, and a southbridge onto the same package, or even the same die. That's three large footprint chips down to one, plus hopefully fewer support chips.

    It would also allow the footprint to be reduced so that the 7" screen doesn't need a massive border - making it far more portable. That, or allow the speakers to be placed into the base (like on most laptops), and allow a bigger display to be put in - maybe even a 10" 1024x600.

    Don't rule out ARM coming up from below either with competitive SoCs. Look at what the iPhone/iPod Touch can do interface-wise, and Linux runs on ARM without any issues.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Saturday, December 01, 2007 - link

    I have made some edits since the first release of this article, addressing many of the items you mention. However, the comparison to a laptop is not without merit. Yes, this is much smaller - I mention that fact several times - but smaller isn't always better. I can type fine on laptops; the Eee PC keyboard isn't quite at the level of a Blackberry, but as a touch typist I find it nearly impossible to type at anything approaching normal speed. So, from ~70-80 WPM down to around 20-25 WPM. Yay!

    In regards to the warranty, ASUS has a very good policy on all of their other products. The Eee policy by comparison has been castrated. Zero bright dot? Nope! Two year manufacturer warranty? Nope. I haven't spent much time trying to contact the public ASUS groups for support on the Eee, but others are again reporting less than stellar response times. Top that off with a voided warranty if you upgrade the RAM (I smell a class action suit or at least a change to this policy), and you can see the ways in which ASUS has managed to keep costs down.

    Again, that doesn't mean the Eee PC doesn't fill a market niche. I've heard PDA wireless can be terribly painful/sporadic, and other than a few minor glitches I experienced no difficult with the Eee. The screen size is also much larger than any PDA, even if it's still a far cry from a "normal" laptop.
    Reply
  • Fox5 - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    As a PDA user of several years who was sold on their "versatility", I'd say PDAs are nearly useless, same as the tablet PC. Both are devices limited by their performance, stability, size, and battery life.

    My tablet pc didn't get long enough battery life to use for long lectures, was still too heavy/bulky to make it reasonable to carry around, the screen was hard to write on especially near the edges, and program lag and random crashes killed it for me. Replaced it with a notebook and found it far superior.

    The PDA was similar, but it was replaced with a memo pad. My PDA now only sees occasional use as a calculator and often as a gps.

    Something that had full pc functionality and performance, even if on the bottom end of it like this eee pc, would be a huge step up. A real, high-performance web browser, real office suite, and what not are far beyond what a PDA can offer, and no other device is this light and this cheap. Sure, there are other $400 laptops, but they're not ultraportable, not even portable enough to wear it'd be no bother to just throw them in a bag and bring them along.
    Reply
  • Omega215D - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    I have the Palm T|X and found that using it to finish off papers I was working on was not a good idea. The keyboard is fine but the screen is a bit too small for that. Then there's using the T|X to access the internet. I hate the browser that comes with the device which takes a bit to load web pages.

    I find that the Asus Eee PC is what I was looking for. Buying a regular laptop for that kind of price would be a pretty big clunker and the other laptops the size of the Eee cost anywhere from $1100 to $2400. I say the Asus has a pretty clear purpose.
    Reply
  • walmartshopper - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    I just got a Vostro 1400 from the Dell outlet for only $600. It has a C2D, 2GB, 120GB, and a Geforce 8400GS. It's still small and light, and the battery lasts up to 7 hours. It can even run Crysis at 800x600 at low quality and get 30fps. I know I'm comparing laptops that have different purposes, but still it just doesn't seem like a good deal to pay $400 for something so crippled.

    Plus, I would probably get frustrated trying to type on that thing with my big ol' sausage fingers.
    Reply
  • johnsonx - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    If you can get to a console, is rpm available? If so then it should be possible to install any packages you want from the command line.
    Reply
  • n0nsense - Sunday, December 02, 2007 - link

    Xandros in debian based.
    so it uses dpkg or apt package management.
    (deb not rpm)
    Reply
  • n0nsense - Sunday, December 02, 2007 - link

    Xandros in debian based.
    so it uses dpkg or apt package management.
    (deb not rpm)
    Reply
  • n0nsense - Sunday, December 02, 2007 - link

    Xandros in debian based.
    so it uses dpkg or apt package management.
    (deb not rpm)
    Reply
  • johnsonx - Sunday, December 02, 2007 - link

    ok, I'm a Novell/SUSE kind of guy, so sue me for not knowing all the Linux flavors.

    Either way, the question still remains. Is the package manager available from the teminal window?
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Sunday, December 02, 2007 - link

    apt-get appears to be fully functional. You would have to know more about what to do to get additional programs than I do, but I would assume you can install pretty much any standard Linux package that works with apt-get. Reply
  • johnsonx - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    How about a follow up article wherein you install XP? Maybe even Win2k for it's lean disk and memory footprint, if there's enough driver support?

    Also, how about some words about using an SD/SDHC flash card for additional storage? Performance I mean, like application load times and such. I'd envision putting XP and main apps on the main storage, and then additional apps and data on the secondary flash card.
    Reply
  • Certhas - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    I will definitely get one eventually. I already have a 15 inch laptop as my primary computer, but it's simply to heavy and bulky to carry around all the time. What I envisage this thing for is as something more portable, for going on a weekend trip for example. Generally, a gadget that will do most things that a Laptop does on the road (play music, allow me to write papers in Latex, load up google maps) and that i can drop in my backpack without thinking twice about it.

    As far as I can tell there is nothing else remotely in this price range that fits the bill. The other UMPC are overpowered and a PDA is more of an organizer and note taker then a minimal work machine to me.

    For the moment the reason I'm holding off is that it seems difficult to get a full Linux install running properly and the programs installed are definitely not sufficient for me.
    Reply
  • Chris Peredun - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    ... and you'll have yourself the world's smallest Quake-3-at-60-fps laptop. ;) Reply
  • ksaajasto - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    i saw the article on his in computer shopper, looks like a high quality buy Reply
  • mihaimanuta - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    Not all software is open source. Flash Player and Skype are just 2 examples of closed source, proprietary software that are free for use. However they ARE NOT covered under the GPL license. Reply
  • BladeVenom - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    I think they should make a 9 inch screen version. It looks like it would fit. Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    Asus cannot void the warranty (at least in the US) because you upgraded the memory. It's the Magnunson-Moss Warranty Act.

    A dealer or manufacturer cannot void or charge for a warranty service based on use of aftermarket products unless a failure is a DIRECT result of use of the aftermarket product and they will have to prove how.
    Reply
  • jiteo - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    Open up the file manager, then Window -> Terminal Emulator. Voila. Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    Ah, thanks... I looked all over for some way to access a command prompt. Even killing X didn't help - it would simply restart. Technically, the menu item (under the ASUS File Manager) is labeled "Open Console Window" under the Tools menu. Obviously, my Linux skillz have started to atrophy. :) Reply
  • elegault - Friday, November 30, 2007 - link

    Wouldn't having Windows CE instead of XP make more sence? Reply
  • Ihlosi - Saturday, December 01, 2007 - link

    [quote]Wouldn't having Windows CE instead of XP make more sence?[/quote]

    Why should they run Windows CE on something that is an actual PC ? The thing does have enough CPU power and RAM for WinXP, I can just see the tiny 4 GB SDD being completely filled up after the install.
    Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now