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  • takumsawsherman - Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - link

    Why is the Tuniq tower 120 being compared against much cheaper coolers with smaller fans? Why not pit it against the Thermalright HR-01, which would be more of an apples to apples comparison?

    I am sure that Scythe must have a more worthy competitor as well, though I am not familiar with their line.
    Reply
  • LoneWolf15 - Thursday, January 25, 2007 - link

    quote:

    I am sure that Scythe must have a more worthy competitor as well, though I am not familiar with their line.


    Scythe's Infinity is probably the closest competitor. I believe there may be a few other sites that have reviewed it.
    Reply
  • Wesley Fink - Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - link

    You neglected to mention that we also compared the performance of the Scythe Katana and Thermalright MST-9775 to the Intel Retail HSF that comes with the Core 2 Duo processor. Until we test a cooler that might perform better than the Tuniq the range of performance is "real-world" between the Intel Retail HSF and the Tuniq. We believe most readers want to know how a tested cooler compares in this rnage - so they can decide if the features or cost are worth the performance drop from the best we have tested.

    In the future we will be testing some new tower coolers that should challenge the Tuniq. We also plan a value cooler roundup of coolers under $30.

    Reply
  • Zoomer - Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - link

    Seconded!

    I'm looking forward to seeing the Arctic Cooler 7 Pro review. In cooler climates with a core2 duo, there is really no need to spend the extra $30 for a huge tower heatsink.
    Reply
  • Calin - Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - link

    The comparison was between the baseline (the included cooler) and the best air cooler there is (at least known/proven until now).
    Should the Tuniq Tower be compared to the best air cooled equipments out there? Yes, and it would be nice to compare it to a not very expensive water cooled system too.
    Reply
  • Jodiuh - Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - link

    Well if that's not reason enough to get a Tuniq. Reply
  • LoneWolf15 - Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - link

    Getting one dropped my temps from my old Swiftech by 5-8C when idle and 8-15C under load.
    It sure was a good enough reason for me. And that's with the fan at a quiet 1400rpm.

    And I agree (with what I think you're saying) that, if you're going to spend $30 for an aftermarket cooler, and the Tuniq will fit, why not spend an extra 20-25 for best aftermarket cooler you can get?
    Reply
  • Avalon - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    I think it's a good addition to AT to include cooling reviews. However, you guys should see if you can expand temperature gauging a little more to also include PWM temps and other important temperatures, as some HSF solutions have a large affect on these, while others don't.

    Also, really want to see the Coolermaster Hyper TX in the next roundup!
    Reply
  • Vidmar - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    What was the orientation of the CPU/heatsink during the tests? Was the case (and MB) in a horizontal or vertical orientation? Since these new coolers use heatpipes and since the heatpipe technology relies on a liquid that turns to gas when heated then back to liquid when cool, the orientation of the heatsink/heatpipe plays a huge role in how the well it will perform.

    I would like to think that you are running these tests with the case in a vertical orientation like what a large portion of your readers would be using. But since you never say we don’t know. If these tests are being conducted with the case in a horizontal orientation (laying flat on a table), I would expect that the results would be different than what people would get at home (mostly vertical).

    Thanks!
    Reply
  • Wesley Fink - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    Noise measurements were run with the case horizontal and an open side. Cooling tests were run with the case in the standard upright position, as our readers will most likely use them at home. Reply
  • Vidmar - Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - link

    Thanks for the info. Now I wonder if someone is making a CPU cooler where the heatpipes are setup to be in a somewhat vertical orientation when the case is vertical?

    If you look at some GPU and chipset heatpipe coolers they obviously had that in mind with their design. Hot gas will flow up, gravity will pull the cool liquid down.

    I would be willing to bet (based upon the heatpipe design) that Thermalright MST-9775 would have done better in a horizontal orientation than when in a vertical orientation. Can you re-test the Thermalright MST-9775 in a vertical orientation and see if it made any difference?

    Thanks!
    Reply
  • Vidmar - Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - link

    That should have been "Can you re-test the Thermalright MST-9775 in a horizontal orientation and see if it made any difference?" Reply
  • anandtech02148 - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    just curious, with a 520wtt psu, does psu fan spin constantly?
    the hardwares you have seems to indicate this will utilized 80% of the psu, what's the total load power for this?

    will this run stable if you put a 8800gtx instead of 7900gtx?

    now i can visit Anandtech too for cooler reviews instead of Frostytech.com, great start with the under $30 coolers

    Reply
  • Wesley Fink - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    The OCZ 520w PS handles a pair of overclocked 7900GTX in SLI mode just fine. We have destoyed power supplies with higher wattage ratings with this same configuration. It is also quiet for a PS, which is why it is also used in the hard drive test bed. We had no problem with a single 8800GTX in this test rig, but we have not yet tried 8800GTX SLI in this rig. Reply
  • ninethirty - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    Wondering -- for those of us with space-challenged cases, could you mention the height of the coolers in question? For people who can't fit a Tuniq Tower, the limitation is likely to be height.
    If it's already mentioned somewhere, then I apologize for missing it.
    Reply
  • Wesley Fink - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    The Katana is 130mm tall (5.11") and the standard Thermalright MST-9775 is 71mm (2.8"). Thermalright also makes a shorter OEM version of the MST-9775 called the MST-9775 LE that is said to fit any case configuration available.

    The Tuniq Tower 120 in contrast is 155mm tall and mid-tower cases are said to be 190mm on average in the heatsink height dimension.
    Reply
  • yyrkoon - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    I second that motion. I have an Lian Li PC-G50, and the PSU sits right above the CPU, only aftermarket cooler I can think of that may fit, would be the Ole Gigabyte one (which if memory serves, it was a pretty good cooler). Reply
  • banshee164 - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    No offense guys, but aren't you just a little behind with the heatsinks here? The Katana has been out for a year & a half now, and the MST-9775 has been around since the summer... Reply
  • Wesley Fink - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    While the Katana has been out for a year and a half, most earlier reviews tested it on the hot Pressler or a Socket 939 AMD. Performance on the Core 2 Duo is quite different, and C2D has only been available about 6 months.

    We are testing some of the older and more popular coolers that are still available because what was true of the Katana on Pressler or AMD is certainly NOT the case on Core 2 Duo.
    Reply
  • JarredWalton - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    If you've been around AnandTech for a while, you know we haven't done cooling reviews in quite some time. The idea is to establish a baseline of testing results for some of the popular coolers, even if they've been out a while and over time we will be adding more cooler results. Basically, we have to start somewhere and move forward. Luckily, unlike motherboards, GPUs, and some other components, HSFs tend to have a pretty long shelf-life (at least for the effective solutions). Reply
  • orangesky - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    Since the Thermalright fan blows down towards the motherboard (as does Intel's stock HSF), but the Katana blows across (and out of the case), it seems like there would be a noticable air flow difference on the components around the CPU (e.g., VRM, memory, and NB).

    Was there any difference noted in the temperature of the "motherboard" (which probably is the NB)? I'm wondering if this is a concern or not, especially for OC'ing?
    Reply
  • Spacecomber - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    For coolers, like the Katana, which lack 4-wire connectors that 775 motherboards can automatically adjust fan speeds via, perhaps it would be helpful to take advantage of speedfan for comparing cooling across a range of fan speeds. (This is assuming that the relatively new 680i motherboard that you are using is supported by SpeedFan.) Reply
  • Doh! - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    A new version of Katana has a 4-wire connector. I just bought one last week. The box has 775 written on it and does not come with a back plate. Reply
  • Wesley Fink - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    Scythe has introduced another version of the Katana called the Katana 775. This was to address the installation and fan speed issues we discussed. The Katana 775 only fits Socket 775 and it comes with a 4-pin fan header. The original Katana, with universal installation as we reviewed here, continues as a current product.

    If you are only concerned with Socket 775 the Scythe Katana 775 looks lik a much better choice with easier installation and fan speed control at the same price or less than the original Katana.
    Reply
  • KorruptioN - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    For under $30, I think the Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro should've been included. Quiet, not so heavy, with very good performance for the money. Reply
  • Wesley Fink - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    We are not finished with coolers under $30, and we will try to include the Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro in our upcoming value cooler roundup. The Freezer 7 Pro also uses a 92mm fan, but it weighs a bit more than this pair at 520g (vs. 300g and 420g). Reply
  • mostlyprudent - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    I notice in the noise charts that the Retail HSF is only listed once. Is this at its idle speed? I may have missed it in the review, but what is the RPM range of the retail HSF?

    BTW, nice article.
    Reply
  • Wesley Fink - Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - link

    The Intel Retail HSF was below the system noise floor at both high and low speeds. We will try to make this clearer in future reviews. Reply

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