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  • Zoomer - Monday, September 18, 2006 - link

    I was really interested in buying this board to replace a dead board until I read the part about ALC 850. Urgh.

    The 10/100 ethernet was also an issue, but I could have lived with that. But no HD Audio? This is 2006, not 1996.
    Reply
  • neweggster - Wednesday, February 22, 2006 - link

    I would like to see more articles from Biostar. They seem to have a good idea on what performance is. Any idea if you guys could get a article on the Biostar TForce4U Socket 939 NVIDIA nForce4 Ultra AMD mobo?

    Reply
  • Gary Key - Wednesday, February 22, 2006 - link

    We are working on it. :) Reply
  • cpeter38 - Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - link

    How come AT has taken down the RS580 article (at least) twice now?? Reply
  • Gary Key - Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - link

    quote:

    How come AT has taken down the RS580 article (at least) twice now??


    The NDA for the RD580 is on 3/2/06. ATI has requested the review sites adhere to this date. However, if you look around the net the article has been saved in a zip file and is available for viewing. ;-)
    Reply
  • cpeter38 - Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - link

    THANK YOU!!!!

    (for the explanation)
    Reply
  • cpeter38 - Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - link

    ACCCHHH!!

    ********** EDIT *************** EDIT ************

    RD580!!!
    Reply
  • ronein - Sunday, February 19, 2006 - link

    quote:

    Very detailed and coherent article! I am in no way in the market for an intel/biostar board (how many are? ;), but the review was a pleasure to read. I found the author's writing style to be very unique and the article overall was outstanding. Keep up the good work AT!


    I second that!
    Reply
  • lexmark - Friday, February 17, 2006 - link

    Very detailed and coherent article! I am in no way in the market for an intel/biostar board (how many are? ;), but the review was a pleasure to read. I found the author's writing style to be very unique and the article overall was outstanding. Keep up the good work AT! Reply
  • bldckstark - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Good job on including the min and max frame rates on the graphs. That is an excellent addition. Now if we can just get the median and mode......... *>} Reply
  • Calin - Friday, February 17, 2006 - link

    What about sorting the graphs based on the min frame rate?
    :) I guess some people are never happy ;)

    Great job, and a nice article!
    Reply
  • yacoub - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Once you've owned a passively-cooled motherboard like any of the recent Asus ones, it's hard to even look at one with a fan on it. It also makes shopping for a motherboard a LOT easier because you just cross off all the fan ones right away (unless you're a mod fiend who will actually go through the trouble of buying a chipset cooler or two and rip the fan assembly off the brand new expensive motherboard and hope that cools it well enough).
    I hope more manufacturers take up the passively-cooled trend.
    Reply
  • Gary Key - Sunday, February 19, 2006 - link

    I disabled the fan and only witnessed a 2c increase on the MCP. Biostar could have saved a few cents and put towards a Gigabit Lan solution. ;-) Reply
  • Marlin1975 - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Sound and ethernet. Why do companies keep using the realtek junk. bad quality (part and drivers) and juts shows a motherboard company does not care when they use realtek.

    Any time I see realtek on a board I think the sound and even ethernet were a after thought like "Oh we forgot sound. Lets just put the cheapest POS on there. OK"


    COME ON. Good chipset but you come so close then put junk on for sound and so forth.
    Reply
  • Myrandex - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    For me that issue doesn't matter at all. My Sound Blaster Audigy 2 is still doing its job nicely, and getting a nice onboard sound solution still gets disabled all the same. Now for integrated SB Giga-bite ethernet is something that comes into play with my decisions, and I have been real happy with Giga-byte putting ieee1394b controllers on their boards (and am hoping that external HDD 1394B cases fall in price sooner or later). Integrated wireless is a neat feature some boards have as well. Reply
  • Wesley Fink - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Realtek does have some really cheap audio and LAN chips, but they also have some pretty decent products. In the High Definition area the ALC882 is a really good audio codec with an excellent feature set that produces decent sound and very low noise. If you go through some recent reviews you will see both Gary and I have praised the Realtek ALC882, which is NOT included on this Biostar board :-) Reply
  • Marlin1975 - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    yea but you also go on about bad drivers that are STILL in need fo a update and other issues. So sorry but realtek is still junk in my book. That and with so many other options from VIA's envy, c-media, etc... why use something that has problems and are STILL being addressed today? Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    I agree. Using Realtek for LAN is bad enough, but using a PCI solution? That's unacceptible. Even if you don't care about GbE, the CPU utilization is rediculous! Reply
  • Peter - Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - link

    The RTL8201 is not a PCI ethernet chip, it's just a PHY companion to the chipset's own engine. This is a research error in the article.

    http://www.realtek.com.tw/products/products1-2.asp...">http://www.realtek.com.tw/products/products1-2.asp...

    The abysmal performance rather more likely stems from transmission errors or poor signal quality - which would point to a damaged or poorly laid out board, or bad cabling.

    PHYsical interface chips have zero influence on throughput, as long as signal integrity is being maintained - and as far as that is concerned, Realtek's solution is definitely up to the job. Question is, is the mainboard's layout?
    Reply
  • Peter - Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - link

    ... and of course, we need to keep in mind it's a 10/100 PHY, not a gigabit PHY. Reply
  • jamesbond007 - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Haha! Way to go, Gary. You have a fan base! =P Reply
  • Gary Key - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Thanks for kind words everyone. I will post a short update to this article in a couple of days as the new bios results are looking promising in resolving some overclock and bios lockup issues. Reply
  • drewintheav - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Gary is awesome! :) Reply
  • Zebo - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    I love Gary can't we get him writing articles people will read? Intel/biostar - common.. you'll get 1000 page hits max and 3/4 of them are because Gary wrote it!:P Reply
  • Googer - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Not too bad if you want a P4, but for me I am avoiding nVIDIA Chipsets except when it comes to AMD products. Go Go ULi! Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Uh, you mean Go Go Nvidia, since they own ULi now... Reply
  • Googer - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Finaly Intel Gets Hypertransport on their chips, like it or not HTT probably is becoming a standard that Intel might have to adopt sooner or later. Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    This has nothing to do with Intel. Nvidia uses HT to communicate between their north and south bridges. They've done it with all their Intel chipsets so far. Reply
  • Googer - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Since the noth bridge has HTT, in theory you could connect an nVIDIA based nFORCE north bridge to a ULi or nVIDIA AMD north bridge and have one of several things:

    1) A dual CPU system- One Intel Pentium M/4 and One AMD 64 CPU running on the same motherboard simultaniously. The OS might need to be re-written so that multi-threaded applications only use one processor. Linux prehaps?

    2) AMD 64 Could get Quad Channel RAM higher.

    3) You could ADD a ULi M1567 Southbridge to get True AGP with that PCI-express SLI.

    4) You could possibly mix and match chipsets. VIA K8T8xx with one of AMD's north/south bridges and an nFORCE Intel Editon.

    You could possibly Connect the AMD 64 Directly (using it's own HTT link) in to the the P4 north bridge with no need to use the chipset designed for the A64.


    HTT on Intel means a whole new world of possibilites!
    Reply
  • Furen - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    Huh? How is Intel getting hypertransport on its chips? HT is a standard but I dont think Intel will ever adopt it because of its pride, more than anything else. It truly doesn't matter though, since HT is just a data transport and using any other data transport gives you the same results as long as it is used in a similar configuration. Reply
  • Ecmaster76 - Thursday, February 16, 2006 - link

    If they do they might acually catch up with AMD.

    Supposedly their CSI project is falling apart. If they swallow their pride their server department would find a boon in HT
    Reply

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