Samsung Ramps Up 900MHz GDDR3

by Ryan Smith on 12/22/2005 9:54 AM EST
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  • ShadowVlican - Thursday, December 22, 2005 - link

    7800GTX 512MB hard to find? i can go out right NOW, drive 5 minutes to a local computer store, and come back less $1000cdn with a brand new spanking ASUS 7800GTX 512MB... and i live in Canada btw lol Reply
  • ViRGE - Friday, December 23, 2005 - link

    Then you're fortunate. AnandTech's RTPE shows that the 512 is http://labs.anandtech.com/search.php?q=GTX+512">out of stock everywhere, as it has been for weeks. Reply
  • mat128 - Saturday, December 24, 2005 - link

    A major supplier in Canada reported an available quantity of 22 as of dec. 22 2005 for the 7800GTX/2DHTV/512M (that's the asus one).

    Enjoy =)
    Reply
  • bobsmith1492 - Thursday, December 22, 2005 - link

    "ram"ifications.... very punny. :P Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Friday, December 23, 2005 - link

    It wasn't intentional, I swear. It just happened. Reply
  • stephenbrooks - Thursday, December 22, 2005 - link

    The first thing that fell out of Google
    http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/memory/display/200405...">http://www.xbitlabs.com/news/memory/display/200405...
    seems to imply that there's no additional "redoubling" of the data - it's still a sort of DDR (and not QDR or anything like that), just with some tweaks to let it hit in the region of 1.4GHz.
    Reply
  • Brian23 - Thursday, December 22, 2005 - link

    So then what is it about GDDR4 that lets it get up to 1.25GHz when GDDR3 is stuck at 900ish MHz? Reply
  • Furen - Thursday, December 22, 2005 - link

    There's 1GHz GDDR3 parts, but they're not in mass production. I would guess that GDDR3 will be able to hit around 1.1-1.2 GHz but it may not be worth the effort (lousy yields, high power consumption, etc) to mass produce them. Reply
  • stephenbrooks - Thursday, December 22, 2005 - link

    When they say 1.25GHz GDDR4, do they mean 625MHz "double-pumped GDDR3"? I'm a little confused by which of these RAM types have 1x 2x and 4x the standard bandwidth. Can anyone here explain? And what will the latencies be like comparatively? Reply
  • Anton74 - Thursday, December 22, 2005 - link

    To my understanding, the frequencies mentioned here are the base clocks, which means that their effective frequency is twice that (it is DDR - Double Data Rate).

    How much actual bandwidth you have at the end of the day also depends on the width of the data path of course - 32 bit per chip in this case.
    Reply
  • phaxmohdem - Thursday, December 22, 2005 - link

    Yep 900MHz GDDR3 will run at an effective 1800MHz, as seen in the GTX 512. Reply

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