Tomb Raider (2013)

The simply titled Tomb Raider is the latest entry in the Tomb Raider franchise, making a clean break from past titles in plot, gameplay, and technology. Tomb Raider games have traditionally been technical marvels and the 2013 iteration is no different. iGPUs aren’t going to have quite enough power to use its marquee feature – DirectCompute accelerated hair physics (TressFX) – however even without it the game still looks quite good at its lower settings, while providing a challenge for our iGPUs.

Tomb Raider (2013)

Once again, at 1366 x 768 the gap between 650M and Iris Pro 5200 is at its smallest. Here NVIDIA holds a 15% advantage over the 55W Iris Pro.

Tomb Raider (2013)

Increase the resolution and image quality and the gap widens considerably. Again the problem here appears to be AA impacting Iris Pro much more than the 650M.

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  • DanNeely - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    Probably; easily if anand is right about Apple deciding it's good enough to drop the dGPU. Worst case would be Apple taking advantage of the adjustable TDP options to tune the CPU performance/tdp down a bit. Reply
  • Gaugamela - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    Really impressive!
    This focus of Intel on graphics will force Nvidia and AMD to push dedicated GPUs forward at a much faster pace at the risk of being destroyed by Intel iGPUs. This couldn't come at a better time with the advent of high resolution screens in notebooks and displays (that new 4K Asus monitor).
    AMD will need to bring Kaveri with a monster of a iGPU otherwise Intel just nullified the only area where they had any type of advantage.
    Reply
  • Blibbax - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    I question how much more can be had from APU graphics with the bandwidth restrictions of 64-bit DDR3. Reply
  • silverblue - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    Iris Pro is exceptionally good, however you have to ask how much faster the 7660D would be with the same memory bandwidth advantage. Additionally, Trinity is hardly going to be in the same sort of systems, and as the GPU is being held back by the CPU part anyway, it does take a little shine off Iris Pro's astounding performance. Even so, well done Intel, on both the hardware and software fronts. Reply
  • trulyuncouth1 - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    I think its kind of a moot point, Selling something this expensive will not affect AMD or even Nvidia that much. You can get an entire AMD APU based notebook for the cost of just this processor. I love the idea of this being pushed forward but unless Intel can bring it to a lower price point its kind of pointless. Reply
  • ilkhan - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    Im probably unique in that I want a quad haswell with the 20EU graphics and a GTX760m dGPU from a latitude (dock!) E6540. Wonder if thats going to happen. Probably not.

    Still, this looks damn good for Intel and will only improve over time.
    Reply
  • lmcd - Sunday, June 02, 2013 - link

    Howabout, rather, a 760 dGPU from a latitude dock? A bit more appealing :-) Reply
  • Zandros - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    Performance roughly in line with expectations, although the compute performance is a nice surprise. It seems to me like Crystalwell is going into exactly the wrong SKUs and the pricing is borderline atrocious, too.

    Anyway, since you bring up the awards and a "new system" for them, something I've been thinking a bit about is how there doesn't seem to be a page on the site where it is explained what each award is supposed to mean and collects all the products that have received them, which I think would be nice.
    Reply
  • kallogan - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    Where is da power consumption ?????? Reply
  • whyso - Saturday, June 01, 2013 - link

    They are completely different systems making power consumption values irrelevant. Reply

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