Real World Camera Comparison, Performance in Well Lit Scenes

I took a bunch of photos with the HTC One alongside a number of other cameras in either a bracket or some other form of mount, and I think they tell an interesting story. If you click on the buttons the thumbnail will change, and the image link will also change for viewing the full res original image. I’d recommend opening the full res images in new tabs and then switching back and forth at 1:1 zoom. The phones I had with me for most of these were the HTC One (obviously), iPhone 5, Lumia 920, HTC Butterfly, and LG Optimus G Pro. I took many many photos with each camera at each location and selected the best ones.

What sticks out at me is how much the subtleties of the HTC One match the HTC Butterfly, it’s obvious how much of the regional tastes of their camera tuners makes its way into the images. Both have a bit too much sharpening for my tastes, and virtually all the smartphones lose a lot of detail to noise reduction but still manage to have surprisingly noisy sky texture. I still can’t shake the impression that HTC has some JPEG artifacts which accentuate the noise in these relatively homogenous regions as well. Apple seems to reflect the kind of tuning I would find myself wanting the most – minimal noise reduction in-camera, encode the noise out, and don’t risk losing any detail. HTC and LG seem to go for more aggressive noise reduction which occasionally leaves that oil painting look, and Nokia surprisingly is somewhere in-between.

HTC One: 1/9600s, ISO 100

In the first Sentinel Peak image, the Lumia 920 is oddly soft at the bottom, the HTC One has a bit of softness at bottom right. Because of the way that OIS works in both these cameras there’s that chance that the extreme field angles will have some softness if the camera is shifted during capture while OIS is compensating.

HTC One: 1/3800s, ISO 109

In the second Sentinel Peak image with the saguaro cactus, it’s interesting to pay attention to the detail in the foliage of the palo verde tree. The Optimus G and Butterfly turn most of the tree into a blurry homogenous mess, the Lumia 920 has a bit of an oil painting look as well, and the HTC One does pretty well given its lower resolution, though still looks a bit too sharpened for me.

In this next shot I exposed for the shadowed Virgin Mary figurine using tap to focus / capture on all the cameras. I find that the One excels in situations like this which are a challenge because of very bright and very dark regions next to each other. There’s no HDR used here.

HTC One: 1/320s, ISO 100

What sticks out about the HTC One to me is what I get from looking EXIF, which is why I pulled that data out for each image in its comparison. Because there’s no way to manually set exposure on any smartphone right now (because nobody is willing to treat smartphone users like adults, apparently), I wind up using auto mode and looking back at what each camera selected in each setting. In the daytime images, what sticks out is that the exposure time is incredibly short, or fast. The result is that the One is incredible at stopping motion outdoors, and this seems to have been HTC’s big priority with tuning the One, rather than pushing noise down even further by going perhaps to ISO 50 like we see the iPhone and LG Optimus G Pro do, if the ST CMOS in the One even supports it.

Still Camera Analysis The Real Test: Low Light Performance of the HTC One
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  • Gorgenapper - Tuesday, May 14, 2013 - link

    Step 1: Buy a metal phone because it looks and feels premium
    Step 2: Cover the phone in a matte black plastic case

    This is why the materials used to make a phone are largely irrelevant to me. I always put a case on my phone for extra protection in case of a drop.
    Reply
  • TEJASH - Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - link


    I actually did quite a bit of research on these cell phone trade in programs, and www.smartphonecashin.com is definitely the highest paying site. They are also very straightforward and easy to use.
    Reply
  • batongxue - Monday, May 20, 2013 - link

    Hope Brian will update some parts of this awesome review according to latest software update for the ONE.
    I really hope that HTC could make better use of OIS with further updates.
    Reply
  • matthewls - Tuesday, May 21, 2013 - link

    I ordered the HTC One after liking a nexus 7 tablet. After getting the HTC One I spent a few days frustrated with the phone because I couldn't mod the launcher to my liking--couldn't increase the icon spacing enough, couldn't change the dock settings, all this annoying crap on the "sense 5" and "blinkfeed." Then I discovered launcherpro, and now the phone is a delight. I would like to get the 3 bottom "buttons" working to have separate, single tap "home" and "running app list" control, but I'm sure that will get here soon enough. Reply
  • vipuls1979 - Wednesday, May 22, 2013 - link

    there are certain cons compared to Samsung Galaxy S4 , 1st , battery is not removable secondly storage cannot be increased , for more comparision you can visit http://mobiknowhow.blogspot.com Reply
  • htj - Thursday, May 23, 2013 - link

    Great detailed review. Very refreshing compared to other sites.

    I picked up an HTC One on Sprint... the quality control seems really bad. The buttons were recessed and difficult to press. I swapped it out for another one with better buttons, and that one had 2 stuck pixels out of the box. Returned that one and will get an S4 eventually.
    Reply
  • getoliverleon - Sunday, May 26, 2013 - link

    Thank you so much for the long, detailed and absolutely fun to read review! I've been reading for years, but this review made me register to comment.

    One thing I sorely miss from your review: The Sense UI used to have very enticing features in the contacts app for power users. You could have something like a unified messaging view for your contacts. I would love to read about this, the good contacts widgets and the other changes HTC made to the stock Android experience. Sadly the review falls short of this. But the rest is great!!
    Reply
  • arunbala - Thursday, June 06, 2013 - link

    Why I'm Going Back to my 18-month old iPhone 4s...

    I've been on iOS since the smartphone revolution. I use my iPhone a lot for browsing the web (on the chrome app), corporate email (stock iOS mail client), Gmail, Whatsapp, paid navigation (Navigon), Netflix, Lots of music, Facebook, following sports scores through built in apps, shopping apps (Amazon, Red Laser, BestBuy) some games and financial management apps.

    I'm clearly a techie and not averse to tweaking my phone. I've been a serial jailbreaker on both my old iPhone 3GS and my current iPhone 4S. I mostly jailbreak for the all the efficiency tweaks and customizations. When my iOS 6 jailbreak crashed I was forced to restore to the stock iOS experience.

    Right around this time the HTC One rumors started pouring in. I was growing sick of all the customizations I lost as I followed the HTC One's launch very closely and waited with bated breath for Brian's full review after the teaser mini-review from Anand. I got the black HTC One 32GB from Costco online for $129.99. I thought this was an awesome deal. Here are some of my thoughts and observations after a week with the phone and why I returned it.

    What I LIKE about the HTC One:
    32GB, 129.99 on contract, LTE, Ultrapixel Camera, Awesome 4.7” screen, great Industrial design and iconic look

    I really loved the industrial design of the black HTC One, except for one glaring aspect that has been oft repeated in other reviews. The speaker grill assembly has very poor quality. The bottom speaker grill was not sitting flush with the screen and formed a small ridge under the screen. This ridge acted as a convenient platform for dust and grime to collect on. This was just from 2 days of use.

    What I HATE about the HTC One:
    Battery life, Battery recharge time, Android app quality, Blinkfeed, Facebook shares showing up in Gallery

    The battery on the HTC One lasted way less than the iPhone as mentioned on the Anandtech detailed review. This was something I expected. How long it takes to charge up was also mentioned on the detailed review but I was shocked by what this meant in real time use. The painfully slow recharge time in combination with the low charge retention made for an awful real world experience. Coming from an iPhone I found myself really paranoid about even using my phone for basic stuff worrying if I was going to drain the battery.

    I've been reading over the last couple of years about how the Android app marketplace has now completely caught up with iOS. I found this to be grossly mis-representative. I went hunting for an exchange email client app for my corporate email not realizing at the time that this was one of Android's weakest links. After trying the stock HTC mail app, K-9 and a free version of Toucdown I was left very disappointed about the quality of these apps. I tried the built in browser, Firefox and Opera browsers for kicks and found them seriously lacking in the polish that I observed on the chrome app. There were a couple of similar examples but the end result of all these app hunting exercises left me seriously missing the app experience I had on my iOS device.

    I came to Android thinking I would be getting the added benefit of customizations and widget screens without losing out on app quality. I found out how big of a compromise I would be making in giving up great iOS apps for not so great equivalents on Android. I was left feeling that most app makers did not care about creating great experiences on Android or that the severe fragmentation significantly hampers their ability to translate their vision into reality on a consistent basis. This seems to me like a disadvantage Android will always have over iOS that I am personally surprised by this having misled by the generous amount of press Android's emergence seems to receive.

    This combination of crappy real life battery usage and the Android app experience has me running back to my iPhone despite an otherwise lovable HTC One for all the things they did right - Ultrapixel Camera, Top notch design (even though manufacturing quality control doesn’t come close to Apple's), gorgeous screen etc.

    I've still not given up on the HTC One. I read rumors about a 4.3 inch HTC One mini with a 720p screen. Maybe the HTC One mini will have better battery life? I want to see if HTC will release the stock Nexus ROM for folks that buy the HTC One on contract.

    Having said all this if I do decide to try a HTC One again, I will do so with the full realization that I will be compromising significantly on App quality. I will have to plan better to use specific apps on my iPad to make up for crappy ones on Android and prepare myself for a less compromising transition from iPhone to HTC One. At the end of the day I'm not sure if the compromises will be worth it if the next iPhone manages to meet or exceed the current expectations set by HTC One hardware and iOS 7 brings some degree of compromise in terms of efficiency focused features and customizations.

    For now, I'm going to wait till fall.....
    Reply
  • npnpatidar - Thursday, June 20, 2013 - link

    I really like this mobile. My only concern is battery longevity that it will become "use and throw" after 2 years. As I am spending 40K Rs., I want to hold it for long time. Could HTC Service Center replace the battery ?
    By the way great review Brian !!!
    Reply
  • erickr.cr - Sunday, June 30, 2013 - link

    I was told HTC that the EMEA WCDMA Bands do not use the 850mhz frequency, do you check that? Reply

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