WiFi

Connected over the Atom Z2760’s SDIO interface is Broadcom’s 4330 WiFi solution. The 4330 is a single-stream, dual-band (2.4/5GHz) 802.11n device. Wireless performance is reasonable - I was able to pull a maximum of 34Mbps down on a 5GHz network - but not great compared to the likes of the iPad 4 and Nexus 10.

Reception was comparable to most tablets of this size but I have been seeing a weird issue where Windows 8 claims there’s limited connectivity on a known network even if there aren’t any problems. Disconnecting and reconnecting always fixes it. I don’t know if this problem appeared more frequently after one of the latest Windows 8 updates, because I don’t remember having it much when I was testing Surface RT. Occasionally I’ve seen an issue where 5GHz networks won’t appear to the W510 without toggling airport mode. I’ve been chalking these issues up to early Windows 8 problems, but again I don’t remember having them with Surface so it’s unclear how much of this is specific to the W510.

Camera

The W510 features a rear facing 8MP camera (3264 x 2448, 1.4 - 2.5MB compressed JPEG size) and a front facing 2.1MP camera (1920 x 1080, ~600KB compressed JPEG size). Neither is particularly amazing at shooting photos, but like with most tablets the rear facing camera can produce passable results for web use:


Rear facing camera


Rear facing camera


Front facing camera

The camera UI and preview frame rate are both solid for stills, but there is a strange behavior where you’ll get a split second of live view after you’ve taken a shot using the rear camera before you’re shown a preview of the shot you just took.

Video is recorded in Main Profile (4.0) AVC at around 15Mbps with 2-channel stereo audio:

Maintaining 30 fps while shooting 1080p video isn't possible it seems. Video quality is average at best for a tablet using the rear facing camera:

GPU Performance Charging, Battery Life & Dock Power
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  • coder543 - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Nexus 10 starting price is $399, not $499.

    Please fix.
    Reply
  • coder543 - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Also, the reported SunSpider time on the Nexus 10 is only for Chrome. If you were to try any other common browser, like Dolphin, you'd see a SunSpider range in the ~800ms range. Chrome is just poorly optimized for JavaScript for whatever reason. Reply
  • jeffkibuule - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    I think the problem is that Chrome just isn't optimized at all compared to the stock Android browser on non-Google phones. Reply
  • Anand Lal Shimpi - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Fixed, thank you! Reply
  • coder543 - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    "Optimizing around 16:9 delivers a much better video viewing and multitasking experience, at the expense of pretty much ruining portrait mode aspirations and making for a slightly awkward in-hand feel."

    I'd also like to point out that this is an opinion and not a fact. I, for one, really enjoy using widescreen devices in portrait mode. Do you know just how much of a website is visible that way? A huge amount. It takes a little getting used to, but it is not by any means awkward.
    Reply
  • Poopship - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    I really like the idea of being able to run any old windows program and then switch back and forth from a modern tablet interface. It just adds so much versatility.

    Too bad about the gpu though.
    Reply
  • nswalls - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    what breed of dog is that in the video? Reply
  • ojingoh - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Looks like a red heeler, a type of Australian Cattle Dog. Reply
  • nswalls - Friday, December 21, 2012 - link

    thanks! Reply
  • tayb - Thursday, December 20, 2012 - link

    Battery life, performance, price. Pick any two. It's pretty clear that despite the best efforts of Microsoft and Intel that this narrative hasn't changed in the slightest. At $499 this is more expensive than other entry level tablets, the battery life is inferior, and the relative performance is crap.

    This device cannot replace my notebook and for a toy device (iPad, Nexus, Tab) I would rather stick with my iPad. I look at this tablet and see the worst of both worlds. Performance is too low to replace my notebook and app selection and battery life are too low to replace my existing tablet. No man's land. What use case would I have to find myself in where this tablet was the solution? I can think of a few fields (medical, dental, outside sales, construction, etc) but most of these are small trades. I see no mass market appeal in this device.
    Reply

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