Meet The EVGA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Super Superclocked Edition 1GB

Our first retail card of the day and the other 1GB card in our roundup is EVGA’s GeForce GTX 650 Ti 1GB Super Superclocked Edition. This is EVGA’s factory overclocked model, with EVGA giving it a rather massive factory overclock of 146MHz (16%), pushing the shipping clockspeed to 1071MHz core while the memory clockspeed remains unchanged at 5.4GHz. Due to the size of the overclock this is one of the few occasions where EVGA skips a Superclocked card and just moves straight to Super Superclocked, which is why the GTX 650 Ti SSC doesn’t have a SC counterpart.

GeForce GTX 650 Ti Partner Card Specification Comparison
  GeForce GTX 650 Ti(Ref) EVGA GTX 650 Ti SSC Zotac GTX 650 Ti AMP! Gigabyte GTX 650 Ti OC
Base Clock 925MHz 1071MHz 1033MHz 1033MHz
Memory Clock 5.4GHz 5.4GHz 6.2GHz 5.4GHz
Frame Buffer 1GB 1GB 2GB 2GB
Width Double Slot Double Slot Double Slot Double Slot
Length 5.75" 5.75" 5.75" 9.3"
Warranty N/A 3 Year 2 Year + Life 3 Year
Price Point $149 $159 $179 $174

Factory overclock aside, as is typical for EVGA the GTX 650 Ti SSC is very similar to NVIDIA’s reference design. Here EVGA is using the NVIDIA reference PCB but with their own cooler. EVGA’s design uses a larger, mid-profile aluminum heatsink, with a partial shroud covering it. This is still an open air cooler, but compared to the NVIDIA reference design EVGA is channeling a larger portion of air towards the card’s exhaust, which uses EVGA’s increasingly common high-flow bracket. Other than the factory overclock and the larger cooler, the GTX 650 Ti SSC is identical to the NVIDIA reference design, right down to connector placement and the display connectivity options.

Of course no EVGA card would be complete without EVGA’s software suite. EVGA has continued to update PrecisionX and OC Scanner X as newer GeForce 600 cards have come out, both of which are going to be more important than usual for the GTX 650 Ti SSC due to its overclocking capabilities. PrecisionX remains as the gold standard for video card overclocking utilities (alongside its sibling MSI Afterburner) thanks to its UI, and in this case voltage control support. OC Scanner X meanwhile is one of the best artifact scanners we’ve seen, though like other artifact scanners its ability to find problems is hit & miss; Crysis tends to trip up an overclock before OC Scanner X does.

Gallery: EVGA X Tools

Rounding out the rest of package is EVGA’s typical collection of accessories and knick-knacks. In the box you’ll find a molex power adapter, a quick start guide, and some stickers. As with all EVGA cards, the GTX 650 Ti SSC comes with EVGA’s standard 3 year transferable warranty, with individual 2 or 7 year extensions available for purchase upon registration, which will also unlock access to EVGA’s step-up upgrade program. Finally, the EVGA GeForce GTX 650 Ti Super Superclocked 1GB will be hitting retail with an MSRP of $159, $10 over the MSRP for reference 1GB cards. EVGA will also be offering a 2GB version of this card at $179.

Meet The GeForce GTX 650 Ti Meet The Zotac GeForce GTX 650 Ti AMP! Edition 2GB
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  • Galidou - Saturday, October 13, 2012 - link

    I won't be back on that thread anymore but just wait for some more stupidly stubborn reply of Cerise, that guy is just a show by himself. His level of global consiousness is below anything I have yet to see in the whole world.

    Sure he has some knowledge, can't deny it, it's just used in a way that seems like all that potential is totally WASTED, thrown to the garbage, buried in vomit and so on.....

    Funniest shit ever.... LOL funniest comments ever..... Can't beleive it.....
    Reply
  • Speelteveel - Wednesday, March 13, 2013 - link

    Please provide these benchmarks where the oc'd 650ti "flies" past the 7850.
    Its not a 50 buck price diff, its 20.
    Also, in these benches above, the 7850 is not overclocked.
    So basically, you advocate to pay $20 less for a card that you have to overclock to get similiar performance, when the $20 more expensive card when oc'd goes into another spectrum of perfomrnace that the 650ti can't even fathom. Oc'd 7850s break even with 7870 benchmarks at 1080p.
    I'm not going to link you the benchmarks you can peruse google y yourself.
    the 650ti can't compare to the 7850 at all. I'm no fanboy, I just found your post dissing fanboys while blatantly being blindly biased very amusing.
    Reply
  • vbmluis - Friday, October 12, 2012 - link

    Yeah, I remember one, ATi HD 2900, heavy, big, noisy, power hungry, pricey and low performance. Reply
  • Jamahl - Tuesday, October 09, 2012 - link

    It's not bad. It's just slow, expensive and late. Reply
  • Samus - Tuesday, October 09, 2012 - link

    lol, that defines bad, man!

    But I'd argue...the only thing really wrong with this card is there isn't any good reason or it to be dual slot. with that power envelope, nVidia really could have rocked the house if this thing were a single slot, maybe even half height card (especially the 650 non-TI) because it's make a very powerful USFF/ITX PC GPU.

    Aside form my dream of this card being single slot, it isn't a terrible card. The 650 Ti is mostly on par with the old 560 (which still costs more) while using less power and being half the length. Pretty much a no-brainer which one to buy there. But neither card is really worth $150-$180 when you consider you get substantially more (25-40%) performance from the 660 for just 20% more monies.
    Reply
  • Blazorthon - Tuesday, October 09, 2012 - link

    Don't forget, the 7850 comes with games and so does the 7770. Coming with a game is necessary just to compete right now. The 7770 also has some highly factory overclocked models that can inch out the 650 Ti while still being cheaper. The 650 Ti would do better at $10 or $20 lower and a MIR is a great way to accomplish that since a lot of people forget to do them anyway, but buy the card because of the after MIR price. Reply
  • TheJian - Tuesday, October 09, 2012 - link

    Love defending AMD everywhere you go don't you :)

    Until you OC the 650 (or buy one already done, you act like they don't sell them on both sides OC'd) making your point moot. No phsyx either.
    http://www.geforce.com/games-applications/physx
    Even batman AA supports it. I don't think the 7770 comes with a current AAA title such as Assassins Creed 3 (doesn't get any more current than a game NOT even out yet). That will make a nice xmas gift to themselves for anyone buying one. Metacritic has a date of Nov20th, which is plenty of time for them to even be late a few weeks an still play over the holidays.

    I'd be more than happy to have another round like we did at Toms if you'd like :) You start claiming MSAA crap again and we'll have a go...LOL

    Please refrain from saying AMD is financially competitive with Intel here like over at Tom's, I don't want to waste my time burying that one again...ROFL.
    Reply
  • abianand - Wednesday, October 10, 2012 - link

    I have a slight preference from AMD cards (I don't why and I don't like having a slight preference between two equally and fairly-competing brands).

    Having said that....

    7850 is definitely faster, but look at the power consumption of the 650Ti. Even an overclocked 650Ti draws power that just equals a normal non-overclocked 7850. So, I wouldn't call the 650Ti a bad product at all, especially when it manages to touch 30fps in almost all settings in almost all games.
    Reply
  • Samus - Wednesday, October 10, 2012 - link

    I have a preference for nVidia drivers, but these days both companies make solid chips. The real problem for AMD is all the games I play (mostly EA games) are optimized for nVidia architecture...like how Source was optimized for ATI architecture.

    Just how it goes.
    Reply
  • Death666Angel - Wednesday, October 10, 2012 - link

    "Until you OC the 650 (or buy one already done, you act like they don't sell them on both sides OC'd) making your point moot."
    Wait, so you can't OC AMD cards? Oh that's right, you can. So that is meaningless, as any OC gains from Nvidia cards will be (likely) negated by OCing the respective AMD cards.
    Reply

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