Haswell Media Engine: QuickSync the Third

Although we still have one more generation to go before QuickSync can apparently deliver close to x86 image quality, Haswell doesn't shy away from improving its media engine.

First and foremost is hardware support for the SVC (Scalable Video Coding) codec. The idea behind SVC is to take one high resolution bitstream from which lower quality versions can be derived. There are huge implications for SVC in applications that have varied bandwidth levels and/or decode capabilities.

Haswell also adds a hardware motion JPEG decoder, and MPEG2 hardware encoder.

Ivy Bridge will be getting 4K video playback support later this year, Haswell should obviously ship with it.

Finally there's a greater focus on image quality this generation, although as I mentioned before I'm not sure we'll see official support in a lot of the open source video codecs until Broadwell comes by. With added EUs we'll obviously see QuickSync performance improve, but I don't have data as to how much faster it'll be compared to Ivy Bridge.

Haswell's GPU Final Words
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  • tipoo - Friday, October 05, 2012 - link

    "Overall performance gains should be about 2x for GT3 (presumably with eDRAM) over HD 4000 in a high TDP part."

    Does this mean the regular GT3 without eDRAM cache will be twice the performance of the HD4000 and the one with the cache will be 4x? Or that the one with the cache will be 2x? In which case, what would the one with no cache perform like, with so many more EUs the first is probably correct, right?
    Reply
  • tipoo - Friday, October 05, 2012 - link

    "presumably with eDRAM"...So the GT3 in Haswel has over double the EUs of Ivy Bridge, but without the cache it doesn't even get to 2x the performance? Seems off to me, doesn't it seem like the GT3 on its own would be 2x the performance while the eDRAM cache would make for another 2x? Reply
  • DanNeely - Saturday, October 06, 2012 - link

    It probably means that, like AMD, Intel is hitting the wall on memory bandwidth for IGPs. When it finally arrives, DDR4 will shake things up a bit; but DDR3 just isn't fast enough. Reply
  • tipoo - Sunday, October 07, 2012 - link

    I don't think so, doesn't the HD4000 have more bandwidth to work with than AMDs APUs yet offers worse performance? They still had headroom there. I think it's just for TDP, they limit how much power the GPUs can use since the architecture is oriented at mobile. Reply
  • magnimus1 - Friday, October 05, 2012 - link

    Would love to hear your take on how Intel's latest and greatest fares against Qualcomm's latest and greatest! Reply
  • cosmotic - Friday, October 05, 2012 - link

    Ah, an MPEG2 encoder. Just in time! Reply
  • jamyryals - Friday, October 05, 2012 - link

    This made me :) Reply
  • name99 - Friday, October 05, 2012 - link

    We laugh but one possibility is that Intel hopes to sell Haswell's inside US broadcast equipment.
    There isn't much broadcast equipment sold, but the costs are massive, and there's no obvious reason not to replace much of that custom hardware with intel chips.
    And much of the existing broadcast hardware (at least the MPEG2-encoding part) is obviously garbage --- the artifacts I see on broadcast TV are bad even for the prime-time networks, and are truly awful for the budget independent operators.

    Much like they have written a cell-tower stack to run on i7's to replace the similarly grossly over-priced custom hardware that lives in cell towers, and are currently deploying in China. Anand wrote about this about two weeks ago.
    Reply
  • vt1hun - Friday, October 05, 2012 - link

    Do you have an idea when Intel will move to DDR4 ? Not with Haswell according to this article.

    Thank you
    Reply
  • tipoo - Friday, October 05, 2012 - link

    Haswell EX for servers will support DDR4, but even Broadwell on desktops is only DDR3, we won't see DDR4 in desktops until 2015. Reply

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