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General Performance

SYSMark 2012

Although not the best indication of overall system performance, the SYSMark 2012 suite does give us a good idea of lighter workloads than we're used to testing.

SYSMark 2012 - Overall

AMD does surprisingly well here in SYSMark 2012. The Core i3 3220 manages a 12% advantage over the 5800K, but that's not as much as we'd normally expect given the significant single threaded performance deficit we pointed out earlier. Once again, whether or not Trinity makes sense for you depends on how much you value processor graphics performance.

SYSMark 2012 - Office Productivity

SYSMark 2012 - Media Creation

SYSMark 2012 - Web Development

SYSMark 2012 - Data/Financial Analysis

SYSMark 2012 - 3D Modeling

SYSMark 2012 - System Management

Trinity CPU Performance: The Good and the Bad Content Creation Performance
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  • mattlach - Thursday, October 04, 2012 - link

    My current AMD E-350 can not handle Netflix HD, which is disappointing.

    The way Netflix has implemented DRM in Silverlight, hardware decode acceleration doesn't work on any system, so it all hits the CPU, and many lower end systems (Atom, E-350) just can't handle it above SD resolutions.

    Everything else I've tried (Youtube, custom encoded video files, etc. etc., habe not tried Hulu though) works just fine, as the on-chip GPU offloads the CPU and they play fine, but Netflix HD chokes, and chokes badly.

    Thus the need for a low end, power efficient Trinity setup.

    I would love one of those mobile Trinity chips in a desktop FM2 package. A 35W TDP Trinity or lower would be perfect for my HTPC needs.
    Reply
  • stimudent - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    We need to appreciate and thank anandtech.com for being professional about a staged release. This is in stark contrast to taking part in cry baby journalism that TechReport.com engaged in. Reply
  • Pythias - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    "Professional" is a polite euphemism for prostitute in some circles. Reply
  • Pythias - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    Why did you remove the pentium from the descrete gaming chart? Reply
  • Hubb1e - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    Because he wanted to keep the forums ripe for the trolls who think a Celeron plus a 6670 are faster than Trinity. Reply
  • Pythias - Wednesday, October 03, 2012 - link

    Seems rather dodgy. Reply
  • HisDivineOrder - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    Hopefully, one of these days, Intel will be bothered enough by these APU's that they release an i3 with boost and an unlocked multiplier with the higher end version of the integrated GPU.

    Price it right at the high end of AMD's APU lineup, bam, the whole thing is dead in the water. I suspect Intel wants AMD to seem like they're competition to keep the regulators away, so they're holding back on the obvious killshot.
    Reply
  • mikato - Wednesday, October 03, 2012 - link

    It would somewhat kill their higher priced CPUs also though. Reply
  • eanazag - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    I wasn't expecting AMD to close the performance gap or power usage gap with Intel. I was concerned that it might not even be able to beat Llano CPU performance consistently. I feel comfortable with the CPU performance. I think at even lower pricing AMD could dominate the low end market. I have a Core i5 860 and Core i3 Arrandale (same time frame). I certainly noticed the 860 appearing in the benchmark numbers. The A10 Trinity is not too far off the performance of my 860, especially when considering price in factors. And off the FX-8150 it has pretty good performance, which is a decent sign for the higher end AMD desktop parts coming soon (can't really call the AMD high end parts).

    Idle power usage is excellent. Power usage can make sense for AMD if you are considering a cheap Intel proc and a discrete card. I think in that situation AMD makes more sense.

    Drivers and support go to AMD on both sides of software compatibility (AMD drivers and game support).

    SATA 6Gbps on Intel with just 2 builtin ports still upsets me. This should be an advantage for AMD at the platform level.

    I want to see the desktop and server chip data next. I am glad that I don't have to rule out buying the AMD parts from the get go. The buying decision will still be that.

    I still believe AMD should make a 200W part combining their FX proc with a 7700/7800 range GPU. I think they could dominate the midrange with that and who could compete then? From price and gaming performance at least. Power and heat still makes sense considering the removal of that level GPU from the case. Hell, I could deal with 250W and be happy also.
    Reply
  • creed3020 - Tuesday, October 02, 2012 - link

    I would really appreciate it if a similar test of Trinity as what was done to Llano regarding GPU Performance vs. Memory Speed was completed (http://www.anandtech.com/show/4476/amd-a83850-revi... I am curious if the trend has remained the same, improved, or decreased.

    I am in the process of building a new Office PC for family whose needs are basic and Trinity fits the bill quite well, especially the A8-5500 or A6-5400K. I want to purchase memory that compliments the GPU well.

    On another GPU note I find it strange that there was no test of AMD Radeon Dual Graphics (http://www.amd.com/us/products/technologies/dual-g... as that a native scaling of GPU platform for this APU, not a high end discrete GPU. The latter usage scenario just doesn't seem that common considering the target market for the APU.
    Reply

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