AnandTech Storage Bench 2011—Light Workload

Our new light workload actually has more write operations than read operations. The split is as follows: 372,630 reads and 459,709 writes. The relatively close read/write ratio does better mimic a typical light workload (although even lighter workloads would be far more read centric).

The I/O breakdown is similar to the heavy workload at small IOs, however you'll notice that there are far fewer large IO transfers:

AnandTech Storage Bench 2011—Light Workload IO Breakdown
IO Size % of Total
4KB 27%
16KB 8%
32KB 6%
64KB 5%

Light Workload 2011—Average Data Rate

While the 840 didn't shine in our Heavy suite, it definitely takes the crown in our Light suite. The 840 Pro is still faster, obviously, but the 840 is the second fastest SSD we have tested. As the 840 is aimed towards consumers, the Light workload test should be a better indication of overall performance than our Heavy suite.

Light Workload 2011—Average Read Speed

What's rather odd is that the average write speed is over 100MB/s higher than any synthetic write benchmark we ran.

Light Workload 2011—Average Write Speed

Light Workload 2011—Disk Busy Time

Light Workload 2011—Disk Busy Time (Reads)

Light Workload 2011—Disk Busy Time (Writes)

AnandTech Storage Bench 2011 Performance Over Time & TRIM
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  • mapesdhs - Friday, October 12, 2012 - link


    I have SCSI disks that are more than 20 years old which still work fine. :D

    Ian.
    Reply
  • MarkLuvsCS - Monday, October 08, 2012 - link

    Considering Write Amplification has been significantly reduced compared to the initial SSD tech, I don't believe it's going to be a problem for the consumer market. Google xtremesystems Write Endurance to see a Samsung 830 256gb with 3000 P/E still running at 4.77 PETABYTES.That page also shows you other brands and how they fare. I would trust Samsung wouldn't put this tech to use without truly understanding how it would pan out.

    That is why the worry of the 1000 P/E 840 vs 3000 P/E 830 is overblown. Either way you have little to worry about with Samsung's controllers causing any fuss unlike Other CompanieZ.
    Reply
  • Kjella - Monday, October 08, 2012 - link

    Not giving one fsck about wearing out the SSD I burned through a 10k-rated SSD in 1.5 years. Now with fairly normal SSD usage - a standard Win7 desktop with torrents etc. on other drives - I'm down to 57% health and looking at 3 years 10 months on a 5K-rated drive. I don't know exactly what is eating it but I'm guessing every log file, every time MSN or IRC logs a line of chat, every time something is cached or whatever it burns write cycles. I feel the official numbers are vastly *overstating* the actual lifespan, not understating it. TLC with 1K writes? Not in my machine, no sir. Reply
  • madmilk - Monday, October 08, 2012 - link

    There's no way MSN/IRC can burn through an SSD in 1.5 years since they're all text. You must be doing something unusual, or at least your computer is without you knowing it. A good idea would be to open up Task Manager, and select the columns that count the number of bytes written by various programs. Maybe then you can find the source of your problem. Also make sure you have defragmentation off, and sufficient RAM so you're not constantly hitting the pagefile. Reply
  • piiman - Tuesday, February 19, 2013 - link

    Better yet put the page file on a different drive and also move your temp folders to a different drive. Reply
  • Notmyusualid - Tuesday, October 09, 2012 - link

    Absolutely hilarious ending there pal... I wonder how many people got it!

    I got burned by them on a couple of drives, and promptly dumped them on some well-known auction site, sold as-is.
    Reply
  • creed3020 - Tuesday, October 09, 2012 - link

    I see what you did there ;-)

    Great review Kristian! I'll be looking at this drive as option for a new office PC I am building.
    Reply
  • B3an - Monday, October 08, 2012 - link

    Did you people even bother to read?? Because you're conveniently missing out the important fact in this article that you'd have to write 36.5TiB (almost 40TB) a year for it to last 3.5 years. I know for a fact that the average consumer does not write anywhere near that much a year, or even in 3 years. If anyone even comes close to 40TB a year they would be using a higher-end MLC SSD anyway as they would surely be using a workstation.

    Most consumers don't even write 10GB a day, so at that rate the drive would easily last OVER 20 years. But of course it's highly likely something else would fail before that happens.

    You're also forgetting out DSP which is explained in this article as well. That can also near double the life.

    I think Kristian should have made this all more clear because too many people don't bother to actually read stuff and just look at charts.
    Reply
  • futrtrubl - Monday, October 08, 2012 - link

    Granted the usual use cases won't have so much data throughput. However those same usual use cases have the user filling 3/4 of the drive with static data (program/OS/photo archive etc) reducing the drive area it's able to wear level over. So that 20 years again becomes 5 years.

    Also the 1000PE cycle stat means that there is a 50% chance for that sector to have become unusable by that time (ignoring DSP).

    I'm not saying that TLC is bad, and I am certainly not saying this drive doesn't have great value. I'm just saying that we shouldn't understate the PE cycle issue.
    Reply
  • xdrol - Monday, October 08, 2012 - link

    You sir need to learn how SSDs work. Static data is not static on the flash chip - the controller shuffles it around, exactly because of wear levelling. Reply

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