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Minecraft

Switching gears for the moment we have Minecraft, our OpenGL title. It's no secret that OpenGL usage on the PC has fallen by the wayside in recent years, and as far major games go Minecraft is one of but a few recently released major titles using OpenGL. Minecraft is incredibly simple—not even utilizing pixel shaders let alone more advanced hardware—but this doesn't mean it's easy to render. Its use of massive amounts of blocks (and the overdraw that creates) means you need solid hardware and an efficient OpenGL implementation if you want to hit playable framerates with a far render distance. Consequently, as the most successful OpenGL game in quite some number of years (at over 7.5mil copies sold), it's a good reminder for GPU manufacturers that OpenGL is not to be ignored.

Minecraft

Minecraft does incredibly well on Trinity. While the improvement over Llano is only 15%, the advantage over Ivy Bridge is tremendous.

 

Civilization V

Our final game, Civilization V, gives us an interesting look at things that other RTSes cannot match, with a much weaker focus on shading in the game world, and a much greater focus on creating the geometry needed to bring such a world to life. In doing so it uses a slew of DirectX 11 technologies, including tessellation for said geometry, driver command lists for reducing CPU overhead, and compute shaders for on-the-fly texture decompression. There are other games that are more stressful overall, but this is likely the game most stressing of DX11 performance in particular.

Civilization V

Civilization V

Civilization V shows some of the mildest gains in all of our tests vs. Llano. The 5800K/7660D manage to outperform Llano by only 8 -11% depending on the test. The advantage over Intel is huge of course.

Starcraft 2 & Skyrim Performance Compute & Synthetics
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  • ananduser - Thursday, September 27, 2012 - link

    ARS ? Please... it's insulting to Anand to compare it to Ars. You're also insulting of Tom's. Techreport is better than them all as they've "innovated" in the benchmark area via microstuttering tests. You should read more and stop being so high strung about your fav sites. Reply
  • coder543 - Thursday, September 27, 2012 - link

    don't know what side of the Internet you're from, but Ars Technica has some of the highest quality reviews of anywhere on the net. Anandtech is good, but they're heavily biased against both Linux and OpenGL, so that bothers me about them.

    Please, show me some of this low quality Ars material you speak of. I would also have you note that Ars and Techreport cross-post on occasion... so, praising one and not the other is a strange concept.

    Tom's does *okay* reviews... but compared to Anandtech, their stuff is usually lacking.
    Reply
  • ananduser - Thursday, September 27, 2012 - link

    Oh please...Ars only knows mainstream. They cite more than they review. The only exception is Siracusa's yearly 100 pages OSX review which every Apple fan reads religiously and extensive Apple related coverage. Anand's, Tom's and Techreport are in a league of their own. Techreport recently impressed me with their "into the second" approach to benchmarking. Reply
  • Wolfpup - Friday, September 28, 2012 - link

    Biased against Linux and OpenGL? How so? There's not much stuff USING OpenGL anymore, but that doesn't mean they're biased, and most people, even enthusiasts like most people here, aren't running Linux, sooo again doesn't mean they're baised against it. Reply
  • rarson - Wednesday, October 03, 2012 - link

    Ars Technica is a freaking joke in everything that they do. Reply
  • medi01 - Thursday, September 27, 2012 - link

    No other site uses 1000 Watt power supplies when testing HTPC CPUs either.... Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Thursday, September 27, 2012 - link

    ...Unless it's Apple hardware Reply
  • mattlach - Thursday, September 27, 2012 - link

    I don't trust Tom's Hardware as far as I can throw them.

    After they were caught taking kick backs from hardware vendors for better reviews, and caught stealing content for their articles from other review sites, anyone who still reads that website is either a moron or ignorant.

    Tomshardware wasn't bad back when Tom Pabst still ran it in the late 90s, but these days its a shell of its former self and completely and totally unreliable.

    For me it's all HardOCP and Anandtech.
    Reply
  • Homeles - Thursday, September 27, 2012 - link

    You're going to have a very biased view of hardware if you only check two sources. I personally don't care for [H]ardOCP (I don't like their site design and the way they present their data), but AnandTech does try to keep things objective.

    Still, you can't pretend that AT is infallible and 100% trustworthy. If you do, then you deserve to be misled.

    Like all media, it's best to check as many sources as possible before developing an opinion of something.
    Reply
  • mikato - Monday, October 01, 2012 - link

    Please link for the kickbacks! After reading this, I just searched Google for "tom's hardware kickbacks" and your comment was 3rd and the most relevant, lol. Need the info. Reply

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