Supermicro's Latest Twin

We got a sneak peak at the Supermicro's brand new Twin 2U server: the SYS-6027TR-D71FRF. The 2U chassis has two dual Xeon E5 based servers inside that are fed by two fully redundant 1280W PSUs (at 180-230V, 1000W at 100-140V).

The two servers are held in place using screwless clips.

You get the density of a 1U server without needing four PSUs for redundancy and without the very power hungry 40 mm fans. Indeed, using only 2 PSUs and 80 mm fans should save quite a bit of power compared to 2 1U servers. Last time we measured, the Twin servers consumed 6% less power than the best 1U servers on the market.

At the same time, the expansion capabilities are better: you get two full height and one half height PCIe 3.0 (!) x16 (x8 electrical) slots. The only disadvantage is that you only get 4 DIMM slots per CPU, which generally limits each server to about 128 GB of RAM (8 x 16 GB) unless you go with expensive 32 GB LR-DIMMS for a total of 256 GB. Therefore this server is probably better for HPC workloads than for memory intensive virtualization and database applications.

This new Twin server also features FDR InfiniBand interconnect technology, good for 56Gb/s (!) low latency network connections with an X4 cable. This should work especially well in tandem with Intel Data Direct I/O technology, where packets are directly transferred into the Last Level Cache (LLC) instead of being DMAed to the memory. This is something we'll be investigating in a later article.

The New Xeon Platform Benchmarking Configuration
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  • Shuxclams - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    Looking at a complete visualization transformation in our server room, looks like the decision was made for us as far as architecture. Wow.... Reply
  • TeXWiller - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    <quote>The new Xeon also supports faster DDR-3 1600. Contrary to the Interlagos Opteron which can only support this memory speed with one DIMM per channel</quote>Interlagos supports memory up to DDR3-1600 using two single rank memory modules, or one single rank and one double rank module if using registered memory, and two single rank modules if using unbuffered memory. DDR3-1866 is supported on a single load-reduced registered, or on a single unbuffered module per channel. It depends on the board manufacturer and more importantly, it can be all read on the manual, so to speak. Reply
  • davegraham - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    AMD Interlagos can support more than 1 DDR3-1600 ECC/REG dimm per channel. I run 8 on a single socket 6276 and it works at the rated speed. Reply
  • TeXWiller - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    Too bad these kinds of errors in the articles are not usually fixed. Reply
  • JohanAnandtech - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    I will double check . Reply
  • meloz - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    Just wanted to congratulate Johan on a job well done. Very thorough analysis, Intel have achieved a very dominant position with this new platform and this is reflected in pricing of their processors as well!

    AMD was already a sub 10% niche (with a market share to mirror) in the data center, now even that niche has evaporated.

    New Opterons (based on Piledriver) might decrease the performance gap to Intel under certain benchmarks, but I doubt they will beat Intel. Intel has plenty of SKUs above the quickest AMD Opterons to adjust prices and kill any new challenge from AMD, instantly.
    Reply
  • JohanAnandtech - Wednesday, March 07, 2012 - link

    Thanks! Although I hope Intel gets a bit more competition though. Reply
  • alpha754293 - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    Thanks for running those.

    Are those results with HTT or without?

    If you can write a little more about the run settings that you used (with/without HTT, number of processes), that would be great.

    Very interesting results thought.

    It would have been interesting to see what the power consumption and total energy consumption numbers would be for these runs (to see if having the faster processor would really be that beneficial).

    Thanks!
    Reply
  • alpha754293 - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    I should work with you more to get you running some Fluent benchmarks as well.

    But, yes, HPC simulations DO take a VERY long time. And we beat the crap out of our systems on a regular basis.
    Reply
  • jhh - Tuesday, March 06, 2012 - link

    This is the most interesting part to me, as someone interested in high network I/O. With the packets going directly into cache, as long as they get processed before they get pushed out by subsequent packets, the packet processing code doesn't have to stall waiting for the packet to be pulled from RAM into cache. Potentially, the packet never needs to be written to RAM at all, avoiding using that memory capacity. In the other direction, web servers and the like can produce their output without ever putting the results into RAM. Reply

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