Tegra 3 GPU: Making Honeycomb Buttery Smooth

The bigger impact on the overall experience is the Tegra 3's GPU. If you remember back to our initial analysis of Tegra 3 you'll know that the GPU is not only clocked higher but it also has more execution resources at its disposal. To further improve performance, per "core" efficiency is up thanks to some larger internal data structures and tweaks. The end result is much better gaming performance as well as a much smoother UI.

Tasks like bringing up the apps launcher or even swiping between home screens are finally far above 30 fps. While Tegra 2 didn't have the fill rate to deal with some of the more complex overlays in Honeycomb, Tegra 3 does. The move to Tegra 3 makes the Honeycomb experience so much better. This is what it should've been like from the start.

Gaming performance is also significantly better as you can see from our standard collection of Android GPU benchmarks:

GLBenchmark 2.1 - Egypt - Offscreen 720p

GLBenchmark 2.1 - Pro - Offscreen 720p

BaseMark ES2.0 - Hover (1024 x 768)

BaseMark ES2.0 - Taiji (1024 x 768)

Performance is still not quite up to par with the iPad 2, but if we look at GLBenchmark's Egypt test Tegra 3 doesn't do too bad. The gap grows in more texture bound tests but in a heavier shader environment Tegra 3 isn't too shabby. While it's clear that Tegra 2 wasn't enough to deal with the 1280 x 752 resolution of Honeycomb tablets, Tegra 3 seems well matched.

Note that the BaseMark ES2.0 tests run at FP16 on Tegra 2 and 3 vs. FP24 on the PowerVR SGX 543MP2.

CPU Performance The Display: Perfect
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  • PubFiction - Thursday, December 01, 2011 - link

    Nope I hate it too. Reply
  • gorash - Thursday, December 01, 2011 - link

    I'm not sure if you can hold the thing without it. Reply
  • eddman - Thursday, December 01, 2011 - link

    "Somewhere to put your fingers? pfft ill trade that space for working area and hold it at the edge"

    Yes, somewhere to put your thumb. Just hold a tablet and you'll know how necessary that is.
    Reply
  • MadAd - Thursday, December 01, 2011 - link

    thumb maybe, a slight margin, but not a huge ugly border, how big are your thumbs?

    the contact area for any touchscreen running windows may need a little bar on the left, small, but tablet desktops arent left justified like windows has been since the wimp revolution..theyre centralised like a phone or a car pc front end
    Reply
  • melgross - Thursday, December 01, 2011 - link

    No. It's impossible to use these things without a good size border. .75" seems to be about the. Indium. The Fire has about .5" border around three of the sides, and a number of reviewers have mentioned that it's too easy to touch the screen when holding it, and doing something unintentional.

    With a phone, you're holding it with one hand wrapped around the back, and up both sides. With a tablet, even a small one, you use one hand with a thumb over the edge. It's too much mental work to keep that thumb from hitting the screen. It even happens with wider borders.

    Get used to it.
    Reply
  • GnillGnoll - Friday, December 02, 2011 - link

    The best solution would be to make apps fully resizable, and create a dynamic bezel based on where your hands are. You just need a touch sensor around the edge and back to detect the position of your hands. Reply
  • Commodus - Thursday, December 01, 2011 - link

    No one should ever hire you as an ergonomic designer, then...

    Many, many times you'll have your thumbs on the front, and even if you didn't have to, it'd be more comfortable. Not the least of which is that it's a lot easier to rotate the tablet when you don't have to hold it gingerly by the edges.
    Reply
  • Omega215D - Thursday, December 01, 2011 - link

    If these lawsuits keep up then that may eventually happen... Reply
  • TEAMSWITCHER - Thursday, December 01, 2011 - link

    Flippant dislike of Apple product designs makes me laugh. Apple product designers and engineers spend months and sometimes years agonizing over the details of their designs. It's quite unlike any other company on the face of the earth. Your tablet idea for an edge to edge screen simply sucks....I'm glad you don't work for Apple. Reply
  • Omega215D - Thursday, December 01, 2011 - link

    It's not like Apple is the first and only ones to do it. It just depends on what's available at the time, the price point to be met and expectations of the product.

    I've had several well made players before the iPod came out, and extends to before the iPod Touch.
    Reply

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