Apple has very quietly bumped the specs on its Sandy Bridge MacBook Pro lineup ahead of the holiday shopping season - all models see small clock speed bumps (0.1 GHz in the 13" and 0.2 GHz in the 15" and 17" models), while the 13" models get bigger hard drives and the 15" and 17" models get a GPU upgrade. Base prices remain the same for all configurations - see the updated spec table below for details.

Late 2011 MacBook Pro Lineup
  13-inch (low end) 13-inch (high end) 15-inch (low end) 15-inch (high end) 17-inch
Dimensions 0.95 H x 12.78 W x 8.94 D 0.95 H x 12.78 W x 8.94 D 0.95 H x 14.35 W x 9.82 D 0.95 H x 14.35 W x 9.82 D 0.98 H x 15.47 W x 10.51 D
Weight 4.5 lbs (2.04 kg) 4.5 lbs (2.04 kg) 5.6 lbs (2.54 kg) 5.6 lbs (2.54 kg) 6.6 lbs (2.99 kg)
CPU 2.4 GHz dual-core Core i5 2.8 GHz dual-core Core i7 2.2 GHz quad-core Core i7 2.4 GHz quad-core Core i7 2.4 GHz quad-core Core i7
GPU Intel HD 3000 Graphics Intel HD 3000 Graphics Intel HD 3000 + AMD Radeon HD 6750M (512MB) Intel HD 3000 + AMD Radeon HD 6770M (1GB) Intel HD 3000 + AMD Radeon HD 6770M (1GB)
RAM 4GB 1333MHz DDR3 (8GB max) 4GB 1333MHz DDR3 (8GB max) 4GB 1333MHz DDR3 (8GB max) 4GB 1333MHz DDR3 (8GB max) 4GB 1333MHz DDR3 (8GB max)
HDD 500GB 5400 RPM 750GB 5400 RPM 500GB 5400 RPM 750GB 5400 RPM 750GB 5400 RPM
Display Resolution 1280x800 1280x800 1440x900 (1680x1050 optional) 1440x900 (1680x1050 optional) 1920x1200
Ports Gigabit LAN, Firewire 800, Thunderbolt, 2x USB 2.0, SDHC slot, combined audio in/out jack Gigabit LAN, Firewire 800, Thunderbolt, 2x USB 2.0, SDHC slot, combined audio in/out jack Gigabit LAN, Firewire 800, Thunderbolt, 2x USB 2.0, SDHC slot, separate audio in/out jacks Gigabit LAN, Firewire 800, Thunderbolt, 2x USB 2.0, SDHC slot, separate audio in/out jacks Gigabit LAN, Firewire 800, Thunderbolt, 3x USB 2.0, separate audio in/out jacks, ExpressCard 34 slot
Price $1,199 $1,499 $1,799 $2,199 $2,499

The refresh also replaces the AMD Radeon HD 6750M in the high-end 15" and the 17" MacBook Pros with the 6770M, which has the same number of shaders but faster core and memory clock speeds (Notebookcheck.net says that the core/memory speeds are 725MHz and 1600MHz, compared to the 600MHz and 900MHz of the 6750M, though Apple's clocks may differ slightly). The 256MB 6490M in the low-end 15" configuration has now been replaced with the 6750M, as well.

Those looking for a more substantial upgrade to the lineup will likely have to wait until next year, when in all likelihood the laptops will receive Intel's forthcoming Ivy Bridge CPUs and chipsets.

Source: Apple

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  • uhuznaa - Monday, October 24, 2011 - link

    "Uninformed consumers" is just pathetic. These things have great trackpads (the only trackpads that don't make me miss a mouse), great bodies, the magsafe adapter is immensely practical and the whole machine is extremely easy to keep clean and will look as good as new even after years of daily use (like mine). And then you can still sell them after a few years for good money.

    And could you please give a source for "you need to plug in the ac adapter in order to get 100%"? This was the case with the very first Macbook Air AFAIK, but this is history.

    There is a kind of spec-wanking that really makes you blind to important things.
    Reply
  • quiksilvr - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    If you are running on pure battery power, the battery does not have enough power to push the CPU and GPU to 100% of its power. In order to get that, you need it plugged in WITH the battery. So suppose you are mainly using the laptop at home and very rarely take it out. What most people do (or should do) is ensure there is enough charge on the battery, take it out, and plug it in.

    However, the ac adapter alone does not have powerto push the CPU/GPU to 100% as well.

    In other words, you need the battery and ac adapter together at all times in order to get 100% of the power for your Pro needs (video/audio editing and rendering, game testing, virtual OS, etc).
    Reply
  • quiksilvr - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    Plug it in refers to the laptop being plugged into the ac adapter. Damn you dangling particle! Reply
  • FITCamaro - Monday, October 24, 2011 - link

    Actually even the power brick isn't powerful enough to power the system at full tilt.

    And you are absolutely correct that heat distribution is terrible on them and they don't have adequate venting. The only vent is behind the screen and the air typically hits the back of the screen a bit causing it to be trapped. Plus if you have it on your lap, the vent can easily be blocked.

    The left rear corner of the laptop gets extremely hot while the rest is not because there's there the power inverter and battery are. Instead they largely rely on the chassis to dissipate heat which means it dissipates into your lap.

    I have a Macbook Pro for work that I'm on right now. Its a quick machine to be sure but after having this one, it only reinforces my opinion that Apple's aren't worth the money.
    Reply
  • KoolAidMan1 - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    It's a good thing there are so many PC laptops that give such a great balance between size, weight, performance, battery life, all with excellent displays, keyboards, and trackpads.

    Oh wait, they don't really exist, not unless you go into the high end business class range. Even if I was only running Windows 7 it would still be on a MBP. Sorry if you don't see the value in well balanced and practically designed hardware.
    Reply
  • FITCamaro - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    That's the problem. Its not practically designed. It's designed with aesthetics first and practicality/functionality second. Reply
  • KoolAidMan1 - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    The drawbacks are if you want to use a laptop on your lap since aluminum conducts heat and the chassis itself aids with thermal dissipation. I always use it on a table so I haven't had issues with that.

    Otherwise you're looking at an excellent keyboard, the best trackpad out there, magsafe power connector, and some of the best balance between horsepower, weight, chassis size, and battery life out there. That seems like a logically and well balanced product to me.
    Reply
  • iSmug - Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - link

    Any chance these can run a third thunderbolt display now? Reply
  • lukarak - Monday, October 24, 2011 - link

    You don't buy macs because of the raw specs. Reply
  • sigmatau - Monday, October 24, 2011 - link

    You buy macs to put Windows on them. We got it. Reply

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