The A6: What's Next?

Apple has somehow managed to get a lot of the mainstream press to believe it doesn't care about specs and that it competes entirely based on user experience. Simply looking at the facts tell us a different story entirely:

Apple SoCs
  2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Process 90nm 90nm 65nm 45nm 45nm 28/32nm
µArch ARM11 ARM11 Cortex A8 Cortex A8 Cortex A9 ?
CPU Clock 412MHz 412MHz 600MHz 800MHz 800MHz ?

Apple has been at the forefront of the mobile hardware race, particularly if we look at the iOS platform as a whole (iPad + iPhone). Apple was among the first to move from ARM11 to the Cortex A8, and once again with the move to the A9. On the GPU side Apple has been even more aggressive.

Apple hasn't stayed on the same process node for more than two generations, echoing a philosophy maintained by even the high-end PC GPU vendors. It also hasn't shipped the same microprocessor architecture for more than two generations in a row.

Furthermore Apple even seems to be ok with combining a process shrink with a new architecture as we saw with the iPhone 3GS. It's generally thought of as a risky practice to migrate to both a new process technology and a new architecture in the same generation, although if you can pull it off the benefits are wonderful.

The truth of the matter is Apple is very focused on user experience, but it enables that experience by using the fastest hardware available on the market. With that in mind, what comes in 2012 with Apple's sixth-generation SoC?

It's fairly obvious that we'll see a process node shrink. Apple has been on 45nm for two generations now and the entire market will be moving to 28/32nm next year. If Apple sticks with Samsung, it'll be on their 32nm LP process.

The CPU architecture is a bit of a question at this point. We already know that Qualcomm will be shipping its next-generation Krait architecture in devices in the first half of 2012. TI, on the other hand, will deliver an ARM Cortex A15 based competitor by the end of next year. The aggressive move would be for Apple to once again migrate to a new process and architecture and debut a Cortex A15 design at 32nm next year.

Looking purely at historical evidence it would seem likely that we'd get a 32nm dual-Cortex A9 design at higher clocks first. If Apple wants to release an iPad update early next year, that's likely what we'll see. That still doesn't preclude a late 2012 release of a dual-Cortex A15 solution, perhaps for use in the next iPhone.

Note that we haven't talked much about potential GPU options for Apple's next silicon. Given the huge upgrade we saw going into the A5 and likely resolution targets for next-generation tablets, it's likely that we'll see pretty big gains there as well.

GPU Performance Using Unreal Engine 3 Siri
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  • medi01 - Tuesday, November 08, 2011 - link

    To care about "improved vibration" I have first to be somehow concerned with current "unimproved" vibration. Which I don't. And I don't know any person that is. Reply
  • doobydoo - Friday, December 02, 2011 - link

    You don't have to be concerned with something to care about getting an improved version.

    For example, I may be quite happy to work for a salary of £1,000,000 a year, but that doesn't mean I wouldn't care if my salary was doubled.
    Reply
  • Grandpa - Wednesday, November 09, 2011 - link

    Anyone heard of staticgate yet? How come nobody gives a review about the static issue on the iphone? Reply
  • mymomentummedia - Thursday, November 10, 2011 - link

    Here is a funny iphone 4s review... iphone 4s plus a 50.cal Barret sniper rifle. what do you get?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RsVEbRt6g94
    Reply
  • chillstatus - Monday, November 14, 2011 - link

    I made sure to switch my dataplan over to the "Unlimited Data Plan for iPhone 4S" and when I run the field test, it still says it's using wap.cingular. I live in Los Angeles, and am wondering how I can get it to use the faster network. Anyone else have this issue? Reply
  • rhch - Sunday, February 05, 2012 - link

    I just found out that my 4S wifi range is not as good as my old iPhone 4 or iPad 2.
    4S gets much earlier "no connection" with Safari, Appstore etc when i take distance to my hotspot.
    Can someone confirm this?
    Reply
  • AlexD - Monday, February 06, 2012 - link

    With this commend I ask for help to find a developer for an iPhone-App that enables to use the 4S for the catching of light below 380nm (UV) and above 780 nm (NIR). The purpose is to identify light emission of materials (inks, plastics) outside the visible range and to visualize it with the smartphone. Even a slight range (e.g. >320nm or <850nm would help me.
    I would also be very greatful if somebody could explain what range of wavelength the 4S camera sensor is catching, if there are filters which can be removed or exchanged or the like to enable the above function. Thanks in advance for your support.
    Reply
  • meace - Sunday, February 12, 2012 - link

    Is the POP memory attachment to the A4 permanent?
    As in... could that pop ddr sdram of 128 *2 be replaced with 256 *2 ?
    I'm guessing there's no way that it's coming apart without damage
    (maybe even in a clean room) but I'll ask.
    Reply
  • Rizi - Tuesday, July 17, 2012 - link

    At first glance <a href="http://cellocean.com/iphone-4s-specifications-2210... phone</a> seems identical to its predecessor, except for the distinctive top-mounted incisions which signifies that a new design of the antenna is lying in wait inside. However, when you switch on the phone you will find that things are different. The 4S does not require activation via the computer except that you are restoring the data from a pre-existing iTunes backup. The phone can be set up as a new phone or restored from an iCloud account. In the event that you do not currently have an Apple ID, there is the option of creating one. A number of iPhone 4 users will ask themselves why they would need the iPhone 4S when the iOS 5 upgrade, which is free of charge, will equip their existing phone with the majority of the new features that are in excess of 200. However, it is important to note that the iPhone 4S is the best phone that Apple has built to date. The A5 dual-core processor, which makes things obviously nippier, is new and it is a feature that is also incorporated in the iPad 2. Web pages load quicker, apps launch faster, multi-tasking is a great deal more fluid and Pages and other resource-hungry apps now permit you to edit documents with no lag. Another great feature of the A5 processor is that it allows you to mirror the content of the iPhone 4S over AirPlay. When operated wirelessly, the iPhone 4S can push out up to 720p to the Apple TV. When connected to HDMI, the number will increase to 1080p. The ease of pushing content of the small screen to the big screen of the fly is an unexpected delight, particularly when you begin to rotate and zoom. In addition, it is something to brag about to owners of iPhone 4; the earlier model just cannot handle with the demands of this technological wizardry. The two antennas that run across the top of the iPhone 4S can both receive and transmit data, enabling quicker 3G connections. Apple has asserted that highest speed of download by way of HSDPA is 14.4Mbps, which is two times as quick as the iPhone 4. A major overhaul has been done to the camera, it now has the capacity to record 1080p video and take eight-megapixel stills. In addition, face detection is an upgrade and it works really well. Reply
  • vitaprimo - Saturday, August 18, 2012 - link

    I don't think it's the phone's fault that much. I have two iPhone 4s (not 4Ss) on different carriers (Telcel and Iusacell) and the never lose signal, no matter how tightly I grip them and I don't use cases. Now, one of the carrier is relatively new in my state and out of the major cities I've had a few dropped calls but they always connect back. I use to have iPhone 4Ss and I noticed no difference; I lost a bag with the phones in it so I'm using my old 4s until the sixth comes out--hopefully in less than two months.

    This whole antenna issue seems to just be affecting carriers in the US--that being AT&T.
    Reply

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