OCZ has released a new series of SSDs called Synapse Cache today. This announcement is a bit different from normal SSD announcements since OCZ will be bundling Dataplex caching software with these SSDs, hence the "Cache" in the series name. As for the other specs, you are pretty much looking at yet another 2.5" SF-2281 based SSD. 

OCZ Synapse Cache Series
Raw Capacity 64GB 128GB
Available capacity 32GB 64GB
Read Speed 550MB/s 550MB/s
Write Speed 490MB/s 510MB/s
4KB Random Read 10,000 IOPS 19,000 IOPS
4KB Random Write 75,000 IOPS 80,000 IOPS

Capacities are limited to 64GB and 128GB, but there is 50% overprovision, meaning that only 32GB and 64GB will be usabe. It wouldn't make much sense to use a bigger SSD for caching though, and Intel is limiting their Smart Response Technology (our review) to 64GB as well. To briefly summarize the idea of caching; the software analyzes your usage and moves the most frequently accessed files to the SSD, while keeping the less frequently used files in the HD. Especially with smaller SSDs like 64GB, caching can be very useful because it can be hard to decide what goes to the SSD and what doesn't - now software does that for you. 

As a whole, SSD caching with OCZ Synapse might be a good option for people without Intel Z68 chipset. Which is more effective, remains to be seen though. Pricing is unfortunately unknown, so it's hard to say how attractive Synapse really is. Keeping the price close to regular SSDs is important because most people probably won't be ready to pay tons of extra for caching software. OCZ is claiming immediate availability but none of the biggest retailers have Synapse listed as of today. 

Source: OCZ

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  • Kristian Vättö - Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - link

    I don't know why but that is completely normal. It's the same thing with Vertex 3 for instance

    http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/350
    Reply
  • MilwaukeeMike - Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - link

    I believe it has to do with read actions requiring the drive to know where the data is, while with writing it can put it wherever it wants. Like when I throw my clothes in the closet... it's much quicker to throw something in there, but slower to find it afterwards. Reply
  • josephjpeters - Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - link

    I think the value of this caching method has a few key advantages.

    1) It will work on all machines. It's not just tied to Intel SRT-enabled motherboards. OS-level caching has been tried and failed and is one of the reasons why major HDD manufacturers stay away from Hybrid Systems all together.

    2) It's simple. No install is required. The OS isn't installed on the Drive so it's literally "plug and play".

    3) Files remain on HDD so there is less risk of a "catastrophic" failure. For many, this is one reason why people steer clear of SSD's.

    It's a cool product. OCZ will be shipping these in their mSATA drives as well. Synapse will be for the desktop User, mSATA (no name yet) will be for the Mobile User and RevoDrive Hybrid is for the "professional".
    Reply
  • applestooranges - Thursday, September 22, 2011 - link

    Yeah, all that makes sense, but WHERE CAN I BUY ONE! Reply
  • UrbanBurger - Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - link

    These drives have 50% over provisioning making them 32GB and 64GB usable. I expect to see a SKU without the software for use with Intel's SRT. Reply
  • Kristian Vättö - Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - link

    Oh, darn, I missed that! Thanks for the heads up, I've updated the article. Reply
  • FATCamaro - Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - link

    I don't trust OCZ software to cache my filesystem for me. Reply
  • josephjpeters - Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - link

    Software is written by Nvelo :) Reply
  • Troff - Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - link

    I don't trust OCZ. Yes, I have a Vertex 3, why do you ask? Reply
  • josephjpeters - Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - link

    I've got a Vertex 3 and no problems... Reply

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