The Camera

I don't expect that most tablet owners really care all that much about camera image quality, however if you're going to include the feature it's bound to be judged. The Eee Pad's 5MP rear-facing camera is pretty standard fare for a Honeycomb tablet. Images are captured at 2592 x 1944 and compressed down to 1.2—2.1MB jpegs depending on the scene.

Image quality is fine for use online but nothing spectacular. Most images captured are reasonably sharp in the foreground but not very detailed in the background. Images can look hazy depending on the lighting conditions. The front facing camera is similarly standard, comparable to the Xoom:

The camera app itself is stock Honeycomb. It takes just under 2 seconds to launch and up to 2.8 seconds to capture an image once you hit the shutter button. Occasionally (even with the latest software update available to me) the camera app will show me a green screen instead of the output from the camera sensor. Reopening the camera app always fixes the issue.

ASUS has a serious issue when it comes to video recording. For some reason video recorded using the rear camera on the Eee Pad is captured at a much lower than real-time frame rate:

This issue exists regardless of capture quality setting (High, Low, YouTube). The front facing camera captures video smoothly but only for the first couple of seconds, at which point captured video pauses entirely. Clearly the camera software needs serious work.

The Screen Battery Life & Performance
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  • stm1185 - Thursday, April 21, 2011 - link

    Great review. I don't see much current use for the transformer now, but the idea of having something as capable as my old 2.6ghz quad core Phenom tower, in a tablet/netbook, running Windows 8, that is just awesome. I can't wait to see what Asus, MS, and Nvidia or Intel come up with next year. Reply
  • damianrobertjones - Thursday, April 21, 2011 - link

    Asus EP121
    Acer 1820ptz
    Dell latitude XT2
    HP Elitebook 2740p

    and many more... they are available NOW!
    Reply
  • anishannayya - Thursday, April 21, 2011 - link

    I own the x201T, and while it is a great device, it isn't meant for everyone (it is a convertible tablet PC). While it runs Windows 7, has multi-touch capable screen (and has multiple levels of pressure sensitivity with a stylus), gets 7 hours of battery life, and works like a conventional PC in other ways; it is also nearly 4 pounds with the extended battery and has a typically "large" 12.1" laptop form factor.

    The EEE Pad is designed for people who want a thin, lightweight device that is relatively mobile and offers ultra-long battery life. If you don't need to use Windows style applications (90% of consumers), then this device is more suitable than even a traditional PC.
    Reply
  • spambonk - Thursday, April 21, 2011 - link

    And all of them crap. Reply
  • TylerTech - Sunday, April 24, 2011 - link

    I also own an x201 (work purchased it for a project) I always have a hard time finding a good use for it. If I was using the stylus to draw it would be perfect but I don't.

    I would rather have the transformer or xoom and use them as a reading device. I just hope they improve browser sync to the point where its seamless as mentioned in the review.
    Reply
  • medi01 - Thursday, April 21, 2011 - link

    Turning notebook into a tablet and vice versa is a brilliant idea. I bet most manufacturers will follow. Reply
  • Spivonious - Thursday, April 21, 2011 - link

    You do realize that convertible laptops have been around for 10 years, right? Reply
  • therealnickdanger - Thursday, April 21, 2011 - link

    Yeah, I owned a couple. Bulky, expensive, hot, poor battery life. Obviously they can do more work, but you pay for it in many ways. I've always been a tablet fan, but they have never been as simple and easy as Android/iPad.

    I'm still looking forward to sub-$200 pads. And if Microsoft can make Windows8 bridge the gap between regular PC work and content creation with the mobile content consumption models, then the world will be a perfect place.

    Too bad the world is ending in 2012, so we'll only have a short time to play with it.
    Reply
  • spambonk - Thursday, April 21, 2011 - link

    You do realize they were rubbish? Reply
  • VooDooAddict - Sunday, April 24, 2011 - link

    A well equipped tablet PC rubbish? ... No.

    Expensive? ... Yes.
    Reply

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