Crysis: Warhead

Kicking things off as always is Crysis: Warhead, still one of the toughest game in our benchmark suite. Even 2 years since the release of the original Crysis, “but can it run Crysis?” is still an important question, and the answer continues to be “no.” While we’re closer than ever, full Enthusiast settings at a playable framerate is still beyond the grasp of a single card.

Crysis end up setting the stage for the rest of this article. As a GTX 480 replacement the GTX 570 is effectively tied with it at 2560 and 1680, and only at 1920 do we see the GTX 570 fall behind by all of 4%. Meanwhile compared to the GTX 470 it’s 20% faster (and 40% more expensive), while it falls to the GTX 460 1GB SLI by over 10%. Overall the GTX 570 is at near parity with the GTX 480, and should be equally capable of playing just about everything at 1920.

As for AMD’s cards, the 5870 (which was never too far behind the GTX 480) nips at the GTX 570’s heels – at times the GTX 570 is no more than 5% faster and no better than 15% faster, showcasing why the 5870 is a threat to the GTX 570 as a value threat. Meanwhile the 6850 CF is tops here at 1920 by a wide margin for only around $20-$30 more than the GTX 570. As was the case with the GTX 580, a pair of lesser AMD cards is going to offer better gaming performance in exchange for the drawbacks of a multi-GPU setup.

Looking at our minimum framerates, the story is much the same. Outside of 2560 where the extra memory provides a stark advantage for the NVIDIA cards, the GTX 570 and GTX 480 are close together except for 1920 where the 570 falls behind by a bit more than we’d expect. The 5870 isn’t nearly as threatening here as it is with average framerates, but the 460SLI/6850CF configurations are still well ahead.

The Test BattleForge: DX10
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  • kanthu - Thursday, December 09, 2010 - link

    Ryan Smith from his conclusion
    "As with the GTX 580 we’d pick the simplicity of a single-GPU setup over the potential performance advantages of a multi-GPU setup, but this is as always a personal decision."

    Going with dual GPUs (specifically nvidia) has it advantages. You get to experience nvidia 3D surround. Yeah I know the additional costs the additional monitors etc that this entails. If GTX 460 1GB SLI can bring so much to the table, I can only imagine what the GTX 560 1 GB SLI can do when it comes.

    I only wish the development on the display side catches up with the development on the GPU side (now that AMD has only jumped on the 3D bandwagon).
    Reply
  • owbert - Thursday, December 09, 2010 - link

    Anandtech, thank you for including a F@H benchmark.

    Thumbs for the continuous great work.
    Reply
  • Shala3 - Sunday, December 19, 2010 - link

    Anand:

    In this sentence

    ------------
    The GTX 570 is fast enough to justify its position and the high-end card price premium, but at $100 over the GTX 470 and Radeon HD 5870 you’re paying a lot for that additional 20-25% in performance.
    -----------

    did u mean a performance difference detween 5870 & 5870 is 25% ???
    Reply
  • szore - Monday, April 25, 2011 - link

    I bought my BFG GTX 570 a few weeks ago and I am thrilled with it. Reply

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