Inside the 600T

When you pop those side panels off of Corsair's 600T, you find an extremely well thought out internal design that's almost entirely tool-less and extremely spacious.

The motherboard tray is the only part where you can't get away from needing a screwdriver: you're still going to have to screw in the board, but the standoffs come built into the tray, and there's a large cutout for heatsinks that need to be secured on the back of the motherboard. That said, I still found popping the I/O shield and motherboard into the case to be far easier than any other case I've used. Surrounding the motherboard tray are a series of rubber-lined holes used for routing cables behind the tray, and these work fantastically: they keep cables in place, and frankly they just look better than the usual routing holes.

Expansion slot covers are ventilated and secured internally with thumbscrews; I've seen other tool-less implementations that have been more complicated and I have to be honest, this seems like one of those places where you're just better off using screws and individual slot covers. You'll probably want to use your standard Philips head screwdriver to secure these screws, but you can do without in a pinch. Again, there's an eighth slot here that makes doing a multi-GPU setup easier, since you can still use a bottom PCIe slot for a dual-slot GPU. Alternatively, you could use the extra slot for additional USB ports or whatever your particular motherboard might include.

Popping in a power supply is remarkably simple; my 750HX snapped into place securely enough that you could probably get away with not screwing it in on the back of the case. There are adjustable grips on the inside of the case that help hold the PSU in place regardless of size.

When you get to the drive bays, you start to really see some of the more innovative design choices Corsair made with the 600T. The panels covering the 5.25" drive bays don't require any force to pop out; you squeeze the sides inside the case and they come out easily. From there, just push the drive into the bay and a lever-based system locks it into place. Push the lever down and you can eject the drive again. It feels a little bit loose but has proven to be secure enough in practice. You can also screw the drive in on the opposite side, but it's not really necessary.

Below the 5.25" bays are the two internal drive cages that support three drives apiece. These are also completely tool-less. The drive trays snap in and out of the cages easily, and have pins in place on the sides. To install a drive, you just remove a tray, insert the pins into the side of the drive, then flex the other side to snap in the other pair of pins. One of the nicer features about these trays is that they're all designed to accommodate 2.5" drives, too, though this requires you to use screws to mount the drive to the tray. To do it, pop out one of the pins and then screw the drive into place in the tray: no adapters required. The trays are also designed to point the ports on the drives to the back of the case, behind the motherboard tray, for easy cable routing.

Here's where we get really slick: of the two drive cages, the top one can actually be removed and then replaced adjacent to the bottom one. It's a very cool idea for cases that are going to need to support extra-long video cards, although I have to be honest here...I'm not really sure they even make video cards long enough to require you to do that. My stock Radeon HD 5870 still has a heck of a lot of elbow room and I can say with certainty that the 5970 would too.

The 600T Externally Installation and Cable Routing
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  • darckhart - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    haven't read all the words yet, but thanks very very much for the pictures. good angles. i am always checking for the few things that annoy me and i was able to see clearly in your installation. thanks! Reply
  • marc1000 - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    Dustin, could you PLEASE do one more test if you still have the case? Invert the top 200mm fan to make it an INTAKE fan (or the rear 120mm, or both) and check the load temps again. When I inverted all fans in my case, the temps dropped by a fair amount. I know each case is different, but if you could make this test and post the result here in the comments I would be very thankfull. (maybe if it makes any difference you could even change the case recomendation to silver). Reply
  • JarredWalton - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    I assume you mean to make all of the fans intake and go the positive pressure route? Because "inverting all the fans" wouldn't really make sense. We should have more case reviews coming from Dustin, and we're working to come up with additional useful tests so if you have any other suggestions/requests please let us know. :-) Reply
  • glad2meetu - Saturday, November 27, 2010 - link

    I think many of us will be interested in a review of the new after market cpu coolers for LGA-1155 around the Jan 9 - Jan 31 time frame. Some minimal details of the new motherboards are starting to come out. On the same note, it would be interesting to see if some of the low airflow problems with several cases is mitigated when an after market cpu cooler is used within thttp://www.anandtech.com/show/4028/corsair-graphit... case. Reply
  • marc1000 - Saturday, November 27, 2010 - link

    yes, Jarred, what I meant is make all of the fans intake. my current case is a micro-atx that only had exaust fans, and the only way I could improve the temps was turning all fans intake. the only exaust ones are the psu fan, and the gpu fan - it's a 5770 with the first "batmobile" cooler, it seems loud as hell in such a small case :(

    anyway, this "positive pressure" test is fairly simple to do. I hope you guys can include it in following reviews. (and I hope you read this comment!)

    best regards,
    Reply
  • marc1000 - Saturday, November 27, 2010 - link

    sorry for the typos, I'm writing from my phone ;) Reply
  • Solidstate89 - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    First off, I love that you're starting to do case reviews. I usually come to Anandtech first and foremost when I'm considering a tech purchase in hopes that you guys did a review of said product.

    I'd love for you guys to consider doing a review of the Fortress FT02. One of the more innovative cases on the market from what I've seen.
    Reply
  • sonicology - Saturday, November 27, 2010 - link

    I would like to second this.

    Anandtech has been my first choice for reviews for nigh on 8 years now, great job with the site guys.

    Also, any chance of reviewing the aforementioned Fortress FT02 case? I will shortly be in the market for a new case and this one his definitely caught my attention.
    Reply
  • kevith - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    I really like this case when I see it, the design appeals to my taste, both color and the rounded edges. And the price of a good cabinet has never bothered me much, the case is the housing of all our precious - and pricey - hardware. And - like it seems to be the case with Dustin and his old Antec - you can almost grow a long-lasting, love-like relationship with your case. And when it comes to love, there is no price...

    And if the case really is Cool & Quiet, I think I´m falling a little in love already.

    But - as so often - this is where my problems start. Like Phoenixlight wrote, I too would have liked to see some comparisons. It´s almost as if this belongs to an in-depth review of a case. Since all installations are different, you have to have something constant to relate to: A build that´s always the same- until upgraded - that stands in the same room under pretty much the same conditions all the time.

    And when you follow the link to the review from bit-tech, it truly shows exact the opposite of Dustins conclusion: The 600T does indeed suck at cooling.

    Now, Anand is my main source for hardware reviews, but the two others I do take seriously as well, are Tom´s Hardware and... Bittech. (Since I live in Dennmark EU, prices and products sometimes are more equivalent at Bittech to what I can buy here.)

    So now I don´t know hat to think. Are my new love like I want her, wellrounded, quite and still cool? Or is she a hotrunning babe, from whom I´l never get nothing but the Blues?
    Reply
  • Dustin Sklavos - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    Personally I'd go for it.

    bit-tech's review is solid but it's at odds with my experience and with Tech Report's review of the same case (I used to work at TR and can vouch for their reviews). I was able to put Crossfired 5870's in this case without an appreciable increase in temperatures or noise.
    Reply

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