The Test

With the launch of the GTX 400 series, we have gone ahead and completely rebuilt our benchmark suite. This includes rotating out several games for several new games, giving us a nice mix of DX9/10 and DX11 games. Everything else has been rebenchmarked using the latest drivers, and our power data has changed as we installed an Antec 1200W PSUin order to keep up with the potential power demands of a pair of GTX 480s in SLI.

For the AMD cards, we used AMD’s Catalyst 10.3a drivers along with the latest driver profile update. For NVIDIA’s cards NVIDIA supplied us with their Forceware 197.17 drivers, which only work for the GTX 400 series. For the rest of the NVIDIA cards we used the 197.13 drivers.

CPU: Intel Core i7-920 @ 3.33GHz
Motherboard: Intel DX58SO (Intel X58)
Chipset Drivers: Intel 9.1.1.1015 (Intel)
Hard Disk: OCZ Summit (120GB)
Memory: Patriot Viper DDR3-1333 3 x 2GB (7-7-7-20)
Video Cards: AMD Radeon HD 5970
AMD Radeon HD 5870
AMD Radeon HD 5850
AMD Radeon HD 5830
AMD Radeon HD 5770
AMD Radeon HD 5750
AMD Radeon HD 4890
AMD Radeon HD 4870 1GB
AMD Radeon HD 4850
AMD Radeon HD 3870
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 470
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 295
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 275
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260 Core 216
NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GT
Video Drivers: NVIDIA ForceWare 197.13
NVIDIA ForceWare 197.17
AMD Catalyst 10.3a
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit

Image Quality & AA Crysis: Warhead
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  • Sunburn74 - Sunday, March 28, 2010 - link

    It is absolutely ridiculous. Like having a buzzsaw in your case.
    http://www.hardocp.com/article/2010/03/26/nvidia_f...">http://www.hardocp.com/article/2010/03/26/nvidia_f...
    Reply
  • Belard - Sunday, March 28, 2010 - link

    AMD already stated they are not reducing their pricing any time soon. This is because their line-up is far healthier than Nvidia.

    They know (and we should know) that the $500/$350 price for the new GeForce 4 cards are not going to stick. There is only some many thousands of cards available for the next 3~5 months. The supply will run dry in about 1-3 weeks I bet. We're going to see the pricing shoot up close to $600 for the GF480, the fanboyz will be willing to pay that price.

    The 5850 was supposed to be a $250 card, we see how well that worked out. While the price did settle around $300, the 5850 was still a better value than the $370~400 GeForce 285 card as it was far faster and run cooler, etc. The 5870 is typically faster than the $500 GeForce 295 - for $100 less. ATI has no reason to lower their pricing.

    The GeForce 265~295 cards are already being phased out, too slow, cost too much.

    So nVidia has nothing for the sub $300 market... nothing. Only the GF-250 has any value but a tad expensive as it should be $100 since its still a DX10 re-badged 9800GTX.

    So when ATI feels any pressure from Nvidia, they can easily drop their prices. It costs $5000 per wafer, no matter how many chip dies are on it. It may be costing nVidia $150~200 per chip while for AMD, they could be paying $20~35 per chip used in the 5800/5900s.
    Then you add the costs for memory, the PCB, parts, cooling system etc.

    It is very easy for AMD to drop $50 per GPU and they'd still make a profit while Nvidia sells their geForce 400 cards at a loss or no profit.

    When ATI sells the 5830 for $190~200, 5850 at $250 and 5870 at $325~350 would help sales and keep nVidia at bay.

    We'll see...
    Reply
  • SirKronan - Sunday, March 28, 2010 - link

    I would've liked to see 5850's in crossfire thrown into this mix. I know you don't have time to test them all, but I think that's the key competitor against the 480 when it comes to bang/buck. I would think the 5850's in crossfire could handily beat the 295 and the 480, all while consuming less power. I believe there may have been another site that did it, but with this excellent and very thorough review done here, it would've been even that little tiniest bit sweeter to have a 5850 crossfire line on their graphs.

    Regardless, thanks for the informative review!
    Reply
  • B3an - Saturday, March 27, 2010 - link

    This review and any other pages on this site are not working in Firefox... they have been reported as attack pages.

    "This web page at www.anandtech.com has been reported as an attack page and has been blocked based on your security preferences."

    This is why FF with all default settings, and just using adlock.
    Could it be trouble with the ads again using a malware/virus?
    Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Sunday, March 28, 2010 - link

    We know. It's being worked on. Reply
  • Sunburn74 - Saturday, March 27, 2010 - link

    The 5850 idles inthe mid 30's but it also does absolutely nothing to stay cool, operating at about 20% max fan speed. Under load it may go up to 30% fan speed, but rarely ever breaks the 40% mark.

    What are the approximate idle and load fan speeds for both the gtx 480 and 470? I guess I'm asking this to understand just how much extra cooling room is innately available. Are these card working at max capacity to keep cool or is there thermal/fan headroom there to be had?
    Reply
  • Ryan Smith - Saturday, March 27, 2010 - link

    I don't have that data on-hand (we don't record fan speeds), but it's something that I should be able to easily grab at a later time. Reply
  • Lemonjellow - Saturday, March 27, 2010 - link

    For some reason Chrome is flagging this article as a malicious sight... Oddness... Possibly got a bad advertisement... Reply
  • NJoy - Saturday, March 27, 2010 - link

    well, Charlie was semi-accurate, but quite right =))What a hot chick... I mean, literately hot. Way too hot Reply
  • WiNandLeGeNd - Saturday, March 27, 2010 - link

    Looking back at the data, I realized that power consumption is for system total. Guru3d measured the power consumption of the card itself and reported a max of 263W, so roughly 21 A. I think my 850W will do just fine since each PCI-X con has 20A each. Reply

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