The first keynote of NVIDIA's first NVISION was...disappointing. I'm sorry, I just couldn't get into it. Journalists lamented Craig Barrett's IDF keynote as being too touchy feely, but the issues he was talking about were honestly more important than Larrabee or CUDA.

The Jen-Hsun keynote on the other hand just wasn't very good in my opinion - there were a couple of good demos, the Photosynth and multi-touch demos were great but the rest was a total letdown. Thankfully, Jen-Hsun more than made up for it with the 30 minutes he spent with press after the keynote.

Why NVISION?

Jen-Hsun started off the Q&A session by answering why he wanted to create NVISION. I’m not sure I totally get the point of this show, everyone at NVIDIA tells me that it’s not intended for people like us, it’s more consumer focused. But then at the keynotes (which are totally consumer focused), the presenters are always talking about the audience being developers and scientists...which it totally isn’t.

Honestly, and I know NVIDIA would hate to hear this, the format needs to be more like IDF. Intel manages to have the perfect balance of interesting technology and demos that the uninformed could be entertained/informed by.

Jen-Hsun and the rest of NVIDIA view this as a convention for the Visual Computing Market that doesn’t have a show, the question is - does it need a show? And at this point I’m not sure I know the answer. But through a few meetings I was able to get some good information.

The Larrabee Question
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  • shin0bi272 - Tuesday, August 26, 2008 - link

    Nvidia seems to be too concerned with other things at the moment to do anything about Lucid's Hydra. I also dont think that the hydra engine cares what the instruction is it just passes it to the right video card and takes requests from the cards and passes them to the north bridge. Its like the Xor chip on a hardware raid5 card. It just sends what ever data is sent to it to the right card or reads from the different cards and sends those requests to the system. Its a traffic cop. Well thats how I see it anyway... whether or not it actually works remains to be seen. Reply
  • computerfarmer - Tuesday, August 26, 2008 - link

    It is nice to hear new things and different takes on the subject.

    One thing I would like to see, is the promised review on the AMD 790gx/SB750.
    Reply
  • Gary Key - Wednesday, August 27, 2008 - link

    End of next week or Monday 9/8 for 790GX plus 780a comparison/update, retested with the 8.8 drivers this week and they changed the scope and tone of the story we had almost completed. The G45 will be up right before it, just to show a comparison on where Intel is at this point, which honestly is not far considering the driver and repeater problems. Reply
  • Theunis - Thursday, August 28, 2008 - link

    Don't forget 790GX and G45 on Linux tests! Man I'm getting worried about Linux being left in the dark when it comes to hardware decoding for H.264 :( Reply
  • tayhimself - Tuesday, August 26, 2008 - link

    Flat out stating that it wasn't too interesting. Nvidia are in a difficult position and playing their cards very close to their chest. Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Tuesday, August 26, 2008 - link

    There's only reasons Nvidia is being forced out of the chipset market are:

    1) They're being assholes when it comes to SLI compatibility with non Nvidia chipsets. Neither Intel nor AMD need Nvidia chipsets anymore. Both have well designed products to cover their entire markets.

    2) Their chipset products are buggy as hell. When's the last time Nvidia released a chipset that didn't cause some type of data corruption? Nforce4? Nforce2?
    Reply
  • DigitalFreak - Tuesday, August 26, 2008 - link

    As far as Lucid goes, do you really think Intel would be dumping boatloads of cash into this outfit if they didn't think the technology held promise? It's not going to cure world hunger, but it sounds like the Nvidia PR machine is spinning up 'cause they're getting worried. Reply
  • Griswold - Wednesday, August 27, 2008 - link

    Right. Thats why Intel dumped billions and billions on the HUGELY successful Itanium, which was intended to eventually replace x86 in the consumer place as well. And it did! No, wait - it didnt... Reply
  • JarredWalton - Tuesday, August 26, 2008 - link

    $50M isn't really "boatloads" to Intel - I think that's the value I heard in one of the reports? R&D is expensive, and if Hydra/Lucid ends up going nowhere Intel won't worry too much - they'll probably still get some patents and other interesting info from the whole process. Reply
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