By the end of Summer, Intel's Conroe lineup will have ballooned from a meager five processors at launch to at least different 14 models. The once simple model number system is now well on its way to being the complicated mess that plagued the P4's system before it.

First it was the introduction of the value E4xxx series, then the larger cache Exx20 series, followed by the even cheaper E2xxx CPUs and now the new 1333MHz FSB processors.

The new 1333MHz FSB CPUs will end in the number 50 (e.g. E6750), with the exception of the E6540 which is also a 1333MHz CPU. Although Intel isn't announcing pricing at this point, we don't expect the new 1333MHz FSB CPUs to cost any more than their predecessors; in other words, we expect the E6750 to carry the same price tag as the E6700 does. We've included the post July 22nd price cuts for the unreleased Intel processors in the table below (note that current processors will fall in price as well, although the table reflects present day pricing for currently available CPUs), as well as pricing for chips to be released in Q4:

 CPU Clock Speed FSB L2 Cache Availability Pricing
Intel Core 2 Extreme X6800 2.93GHz 1066 4MB Now $999
Intel Core 2 Duo E6850 3.00GHz 1333 4MB Q3 $266
Intel Core 2 Duo E6750 2.66GHz 1333 4MB Q3 $183
Intel Core 2 Duo E6700 2.66GHz 1066 4MB Now $316
Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 2.40GHz 1066 4MB Now $224
Intel Core 2 Duo E6550 2.33GHz 1333 4MB Q3 $163
Intel Core 2 Duo E6540 2.33GHz 1333 4MB Q3 $163
Intel Core 2 Duo E6420 2.13GHz 1066 4MB Now $183
Intel Core 2 Duo E6400 2.13GHz 1066 2MB Now $183
Intel Core 2 Duo E6320 1.86GHz 1066 4MB Now $163
Intel Core 2 Duo E6300 1.86GHz 1066 2MB Now $163
Intel Core 2 Duo E4600 2.40GHz 800 2MB Q4 $133
Intel Core 2 Duo E4500 2.20GHz 800 2MB Q3 $133
Intel Core 2 Duo E4400 2.00GHz 800 2MB Now $133
Intel Core 2 Duo E4300 1.80GHz 800 2MB Now $113
Intel Pentium E2180 2.00GHz 800 1MB Q4 $84
Intel Pentium E2160 1.80GHz 800 1MB Now $84
Intel Pentium E2140 1.60GHz 800 1MB Now $74

Intel sent out samples of its Core 2 Duo E6750 ahead of their scheduled availability as a preview (and probably to jab at its competitor a bit), so the processor we're previewing won't be available for a little while. Intel's internal roadmaps show Q3 as the timeframe to expect its 1333MHz FSB CPUs, but Intel's official statement is that these CPUs will be available "later this summer."


Keep in mind that AMD's pricing is keeping the company's lineup quite competitive with Intel below $300. You can buy all Socket-AM2 AMD processors for less than $300, resulting in great price/performance from the guys in green.

 CPU Clock Speed L2 Cache Price
AMD Athlon 64 X2 6000+ 3.0GHz 1MBx2 $241
AMD Athlon 64 X2 5600+ 2.8GHz 1MBx2 $188
AMD Athlon 64 X2 5200+ 2.6GHz 1MBx2 $178
AMD Athlon 64 X2 5000+ 2.6GHz 512KBx2 $167
AMD Athlon 64 X2 4800+ 2.5GHz 512KBx2 $136
AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400+ 2.3GHz 512KBx2 $121
AMD Athlon 64 X2 4000+ 2.1GHz 512KBx2 $104
AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+ 2.0GHz 512KBx2 $83
AMD Athlon 64 X2 3600+ 1.9GHz 512KBx2 $73

Note that AMD will respond with its own set of price cuts in late July to keep the landscape competitive after Intel's cost cutting measures.

Tell it To Me Straight Anand: Is it Any faster?
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  • zsdersw - Monday, June 25, 2007 - link

    That's the P35 chipset. The article coldpower was pointing to is P965.. and he said modified his statement with "here", meaning "in the article mentioned". Reply
  • TA152H - Monday, June 25, 2007 - link

    So you think that's relevant? People are going to buy 1333 FSB for the P965???? Again, are you crazy? P965 doesn't even support 1333 officially. P35 is what's important. Reply
  • zsdersw - Tuesday, June 26, 2007 - link

    And besides.. the marginal improvement in overall system performance that P35 brings to the table doesn't prove or reliably suggest that Core 2 is particularly dependent on memory bandwidth or speed. Reply
  • TA152H - Tuesday, June 26, 2007 - link

    You're seriously confused.

    Most of the information out now shows that you get pretty good performance with higher performance memory running at high clock speeds, especially for DDR3. It's now becoming common knowledge. But, they test DDR2-800 for some reason. To really see the performance of 1333 FSB, they should be using it with the proper memory instead of obsolete memory running at inadequate clock speeds. Luckily, there is another site that promised to do that in the very near future. Why they couldn't figure that out here is a mystery to me though, it kind of hits one in the face.
    Reply
  • zsdersw - Tuesday, June 26, 2007 - link

    That's the expectation: higher performance with memory running at higher speeds. None of that suggests that Core 2's performance hinges upon extracting more and more out of the memory/chipset, though. Reply
  • zsdersw - Tuesday, June 26, 2007 - link

    .. or, rather, that Core 2's performance depends on extracting more and more out of the memory/chipset. Reply
  • zsdersw - Tuesday, June 26, 2007 - link

    All I'm saying is that you're barking up the wrong tree. coldpower's reference was to the P965, and then you started talking about P35 as if it had something to do with the results of the P965. They're separate. Reply
  • TA152H - Tuesday, June 26, 2007 - link

    Are you unable to understand things in context?? Or are you arguing just to argue?

    The P965 is irrelevant, therefore his post is irrelevant, and therefore he has no point. The P965 doesn't matter for FSB 1333 processors, the P35 does.

    My point was that they should be running memory at 1333 speeds, which means the P35. He brought up some nonsense that was irrelevant, and now you think that it was, and the P35 isn't. It's like the Twilight Zone.
    Reply
  • coldpower27 - Wednesday, June 27, 2007 - link

    No, my post is completely relevant, if your going to argue about official support on the P965 for 1.33GHZ FSB processors then DDR3-1333 is rejected to it being not officially supported by the P35 Express chipset, the only chipset to have official support for that is X38.

    If you need to prod others then I believe it's you who are the one that can't stand losing an argument.
    Reply
  • zsdersw - Tuesday, June 26, 2007 - link

    An established chipset on which the Core 2 processors run is not irrelevant to the issue he was addressing: Core 2 performance vis-a-vis memory bandwidth/speed. Reply

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