Memory Specifications

We continue to utilize a 2x512MB memory configuration in order to stay consistent with our previous test results. Our choice of memory remained the same for both our DDR and DDR2 base tests. All test results with DDR2-667 at 3-4-4-10 and DDR2-800 at 4-4-4-12 were generated with the voltage increased to 2.1V on the Transcend modules that performed admirably throughout our testing regimen. We would also like to mention that we tested our TwinMos Twister DDR2-667 512MB modules at even lower latencies at DDR2-667/800 with results being provided in our final article.

Our DDR memory is from Patriot Memory and resided in one of our test systems for several weeks. The memory features low latencies at DDR-400 (PC3200) and costs around $100 for a 1GB kit.

Patriot PDC1G3200LLK Memory Specifications
Number of DIMMs & Banks 2 DS
DIMM Size 512MB
Total Memory 1 GB
Rated Timings 2-3-2-5 1T at DDR-400
Rated Voltage 2.6V

Additional Information on these very popular DIMMs is available at the Patriot website. We have memory that offers additional headroom for overclocking and also memory that was representative of PC3200 modules shipped a couple of years ago with 2.5 CAS ratings. However, we felt like this memory is a good blend of performance and pricing for our testing.

Our DDR2 memory is from Transcend and was utilized in some extensive HTPC testing for our upcoming Intel DHCAT article. The memory features average latencies at DDR2-667 but was able to perform at much lower latencies in our testing with increased voltages at DDR2-667 and DDR2-800 while costing around $70 for a 1GB kit.

Transcend JetRam Memory Specifications
Number of DIMMs & Banks 2 DS
DIMM Size 512MB
Total Memory 1 GB
Rated Timings 5-5-5-12 at DDR2-667
Rated Voltage 1.8V

Transcend has additional specifications for this memory at their website. We highly recommend you take a look at Transcend's memory offerings and once again we found our particular test modules to offer the perfect blend of price and performance in our budget ASRock platform.

We also completed testing with 512MB memory modules from TwinMos and Corsair that offer much lower latencies but with costs nearing the 2GB ultra value kits based on Elpida memory.

Our ASRock motherboards offer the following options for each memory speed. Although DDR-266 and DDR2-400 is fully supported depending upon board choice we will not be testing at these memory speeds. The current BIOS options from ASRock offer a wide array of memory setting options but are very limited in voltage options with low, normal, and high being the choices.

ASRock 775Dual-VSTA
Auto DDR2-533 DDR2-667 DDR-266 DDR-333 DDR-400
FSB 1066 X X X X X X
FSB 800 X X X X X X
FSB 533 X X X X X X

ASRock ConRoeXFire-ESATA2
Auto DDR2-400 DDR2-533 DDR2-667
FSB 1066 X X X X
FSB 800 X X X X
FSB 533 X X X X

ASRock 775i65G
Auto DDR-266 DDR-333 DDR-400
FSB 1066 X X X X
FSB 800 X X X X
FSB 533 X X X X

Our Biostar TForce P965 Deluxe and DFI Infinity 975X/G motherboards offer full support for DDR2-400, DDR2-533, DDR2-667, and DDR2-800 memory speeds. Additional details on these boards can be found in our Conroe Buying Guide.

Index System Configuration
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  • Questar - Monday, August 14, 2006 - link

    Buy the cheapest memory you can find and spend the money you save somewhere else. Reply
  • deathwalker - Monday, August 14, 2006 - link

    This does seem to validate from a cost vs. performance basis this motherboard..however I remain a tad sqeemish about making a platform jump from AMD to Intel using this board. Having said that though, if you are on a tight budget and you have to migrate parts I suppose giving this board a shot isn't a bad idea. Reply
  • Gary Key - Monday, August 14, 2006 - link

    quote:

    This does seem to validate from a cost vs. performance basis this motherboard..however I remain a tad sqeemish about making a platform jump from AMD to Intel using this board. Having said that though, if you are on a tight budget and you have to migrate parts I suppose giving this board a shot isn't a bad idea.


    We will be reviewing some value/budget AMD AM2 combo motherboards in the future so the idea of incrementally upgrading to the newer platform from early S754/939 still holds true to a certain degree.
    Reply
  • blppt - Monday, August 14, 2006 - link

    On page 6...

    "Although AGP is basically dead and the most powerful card available is based on the 7800GS chipset, we can see that it is still a very competitive solution in the mid-range market as is low latency DDR memory with the right chipset."

    What about the limited edition Gainward 7876 BLISS, which is supposedly actually based on the 7900GT? Thats considerably more powerful than a regular 7800GS.

    http://www.gainward.net/products/product.php?produ...">BLISS

    Last I checked, overlockers uk still had them in stock. Although at ~$445 american, you'd wonder if its worth it, or just upgrade to an X2 and PCI-E mobo instead.
    Reply
  • Gary Key - Monday, August 14, 2006 - link

    I have an inquiry into Gainward about the actual core used on this card. They still advertise it as a 7800GS based unit. Yes, it is very expensive when you can upgrade your CPU, motherboard, and memory for about the same price. Reply
  • blppt - Monday, August 14, 2006 - link

    Yeah, they advertise it like that, but its a 24 pipe card clocked at 450/1250, which seems to be somewhere between a 7800GT and a 7900GT. Reply
  • poohbear - Monday, August 14, 2006 - link

    "Who knew that AGP 8x and DDR would still be this competitive after a myriad of chipset, memory, CPU, and GPU enhancements over the last three years?"

    i thought it was pretty settled that the move from agp 8x was introduced for 1.) marketing reasons so ppl actually buy new chipsets we dont need and 2.) so nvidia could make some extra cash off their SLI gig. the bandwidth agp 8x provided was never saturated. great article nonetheless showing that value boards are still a nice option (i own the Asrock Dualsata2, great mobo btw after they fixed the 274htt cap).


    on a sidenote i love the part "deux" in the title, we're so international @ anandtech aint we.;) or maybe u're just canadian, hafta include some french in everything.:p
    Reply
  • bob661 - Monday, August 14, 2006 - link

    quote:

    nvidia could make some extra cash off their SLI gig.
    I guess ATI doesn't count, huh? Also, would AGP provide the bandwidth necessary for SLI and Xfire setups? People keep making these sweeping "we don't need PCIe" statements without knowing or stating all of the factors involved.
    Reply
  • Kiijibari - Tuesday, August 15, 2006 - link

    quote:

    Also, would AGP provide the bandwidth necessary for SLI and Xfire setups?
    Have you red the last AGP 3.0 Specification ? If not look here at p. 115 / 5.2.3:

    http://members.datafast.net.au/dft0802/specs/agp30...">http://members.datafast.net.au/dft0802/specs/agp30...

    In Short: Multiple video cards are possible with AGP 3.0 :)

    cheers

    Kiijibari
    Reply
  • Gary Key - Monday, August 14, 2006 - link

    I added my sarcastic comment notation at the end of the statement. ;-) While PCI Express is certainly a welcome technology and will be viable for a long time (in computer terms), it was introduced too early and abruptly in my opinion. Except for SLI/CrossFire type setups, there was no real "engineering" requirement for it on the desktop until recently. Yes, there is a French/Canadian influence in the household. :) Reply

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