Right now, the National Association of Broadcasters conference is on, and Dell is using it to launch their latest UltraSharp display. The Dell UltraSharp UP2718Q is the company’s first display to support HDR10, in addition to its UHD 3840x2160 resolution, and it’s backed by the UHD Alliance Premium Certification.

Dell has been in the UHD display game for some time, and the UltraSharp U2715Q and U2415Q have been solid displays for the company for some time, but the latest model takes Dell to a new level. The UP2718Q offers a very wide color gamut, supporting up to 97.7% of DCI-P3 (76.9% Rec 2020), and each display comes factory calibrated. The monitor has an adjustable internal lookup-table as well, so it should be able to be further tuned accurately if necessary.

HDR, or High Dynamic Range, requires much brighter backlighting than is typical in a desktop display, and the UP2718Q is stated to hit up to 1000 nits, and while not listed in Dell's brief press release, this is very likely being driven by full-array backlighting.

This display is targeted directly at professionals, and it has a price tag to go along with that, with availability scheduled for May 23 at $1999.99.


Dell UltraSharp U2718Q

Dell is also launching a couple of other UltraSharp displays, featuring InfinityEdge displays. The U2718Q is a 27-inch UHD model, and the U2518D is a 25-inch model that’s a lower resolution that’s not specified. These are targeted more at the consumer, and won’t support HDR or the wide gamuts. Dell didn’t announce a lot of details on these, but expect sRGB coverage only. The lower feature set drives the price down quite a bit though, with the U2718Q set to be available in July for $699.99, and the U2518D in the same time frame for $499.99.


Dell UltraSharp U2518D

Dell certainly isn’t alone in the HDR Professional display market, with ASUS and LG both announcing UHD HDR displays recently as well, but Dell has a substantial presence in the enterprise which will likely help them here.

Source: Dell

POST A COMMENT

27 Comments

View All Comments

  • Solidstate89 - Saturday, April 22, 2017 - link

    The only use for a curved screen is with a desktop. You sit close enough that it actually has benefits as it wraps around you FoV.

    For TVs they're worthless.
    Reply
  • Gothmoth - Friday, April 21, 2017 - link

    curved.... lol.

    before i use a stupid curved screen i go back to tubes....
    Reply
  • MrSpadge - Friday, April 21, 2017 - link

    Better use a clever curved one, then. Reply
  • madwolfa - Saturday, April 22, 2017 - link

    Ultrawide - maybe. Curved? Please no. Reply
  • Frenetic Pony - Friday, April 21, 2017 - link

    Well finally a monitor with 1k nits for brightness, and at least approaching REC 2020 gamut too. Praise be Odin the all father if it isn't close to what I want (where's Freesync 2 support???) Reply
  • vladx - Friday, April 21, 2017 - link

    Why would you need Freesyn on a non-gaming monitor? Reply
  • Kamus - Friday, April 21, 2017 - link

    because it's free? Reply
  • ddriver - Friday, April 21, 2017 - link

    So is herpes. Reply
  • QinX - Friday, April 21, 2017 - link

    Because it's easier on the eyes when scrolling or moving the mouse. Also some people work with 3D modeling. Reply
  • Gothmoth - Friday, April 21, 2017 - link

    nonsense..... Reply

Log in

Don't have an account? Sign up now